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What's the current workflow


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#1 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 09:19 PM

I have a short film (5 pages.) coming up, and the production's intention is to shoot on 35mm, for a digital finish. (Festival projection.) As I've been out of the film game for a while, I'm no longer familiar with the transfer options. Of course, the transfer will be tapeless and HD. But, what are the formats and why chose one over the other? The film will be cut in Final Cut. We hope not to shoot more than 6500', so I can't imagine the storage and computing are going to be that demanding.

Thanks. Cheers.
Jon.
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#2 Michael Kubaszak

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 12:55 AM

What I'm doing for my film(shooting 5000' of 35) is after processing, doing an HD telecine of all footage to a hard drive in pro-res HQ 4:2:2 files.

check this out:http://www.cinelicious.tv/?page_id=11
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#3 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 04:46 AM

I know the workflow as follows and it hasn't change mauch in the last 5-10 years:
After your film comes from the lab it goes through a "one light" (=very basic CC) standard def telecine.
I always had two different playouts - one with keycode and one sans.
Edit your film (for my lab it HAD to be an Avid). After you're done, export an EDL. Your selected takes will now be be either scanned (DPX image sequence / raw with no CC) or a HD telecine (with basic Colorgrading). The output format of the HD can vary. Mostly a file format that stores more than 8 bits per channel.
Re-edit your sequences in your target format (HD/2K/4K) with a second CC.
Add VFX.
Screen it to the producer and reshoot :lol:
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#4 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 10:22 AM

Ok. Been talking with Technicolor, and I think the idea is transfer everything to HDcam SR, and go from there, then create and edit in pro-res hq. I'm wondering about the decision to shoot in 3 perf. I guess this will eliminate most of my ability to reframe the image in post. Essentially, it's already cropped practically down to 1.85:1. Am I right? I have a slight worry about boom reflections and such.

Thanks.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 10:59 AM

Ok. Been talking with Technicolor, and I think the idea is transfer everything to HDcam SR, and go from there, then create and edit in pro-res hq. I'm wondering about the decision to shoot in 3 perf. I guess this will eliminate most of my ability to reframe the image in post. Essentially, it's already cropped practically down to 1.85:1. Am I right? I have a slight worry about boom reflections and such.

Thanks.


The 3-perf negative is the same size as HD, 16x9 (1.78 : 1).

The cost savings over 4-perf is well worth making the effort to avoid the boom dropping into the picture area. I've shot several projects in 3-perf and haven't had any issues regarding the need to reframe in post. If you are shooting film, you still have a look-around area outside of the frame in the viewfinder and video tap image so there isn't much excuse for the boom getting into picture. Just tell the sound people that you have limited ability to fix it if they do and to keep it well out of picture.

I mean, it's the same issue if you shoot HD or on any 16x9 camera, just that in this case, you have a look-around area so there is even less excuse for dipping into picture (that's one of the big advantages of the Red camera, that it also has a look-around area on the monitors.)
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#6 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 06:56 PM

The 3-perf negative is the same size as HD, 16x9 (1.78 : 1).

The cost savings over 4-perf is well worth making the effort to avoid the boom dropping into the picture area. I've shot several projects in 3-perf and haven't had any issues regarding the need to reframe in post. If you are shooting film, you still have a look-around area outside of the frame in the viewfinder and video tap image so there isn't much excuse for the boom getting into picture. Just tell the sound people that you have limited ability to fix it if they do and to keep it well out of picture.

I mean, it's the same issue if you shoot HD or on any 16x9 camera, just that in this case, you have a look-around area so there is even less excuse for dipping into picture (that's one of the big advantages of the Red camera, that it also has a look-around area on the monitors.)

Thanks, David.
Did I mention it's my own film?
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#7 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 12:06 PM

Hey David,

Were your 3perf projects TV shows, or did they go to theatrical print?
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