Jump to content


Photo

red eye effect


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Ian Coad

Ian Coad
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 March 2010 - 12:36 AM

for a long time i've been wanting to know how to get that 'red eye' effect that you see in tons of low quality consumer-grade photographs, often from disposable cameras. this effect showed up in blade runner (the owl) and in some of the replicants eyes. mark romanek's music video for fiona apple, 'criminal' recreated the disposable camera effect - light over the camera, lots of fall off, red eyes.

i red something about it on wikipedia mentioning that it had to do with the fact that with flash photography the iris in the human eye doesn't have time to close before the flash goes off, so light bouces off the back of the eye and is reflected back towards camera.

any suggestions of how to do this?
  • 0

#2 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 March 2010 - 01:58 AM

What you want is a bright hard light as close to camera as possible. It is in fact light bouncing off your retina and back out thru the iris. Nocturnal animals often have even more reflective retinas than we do, which is why you see their eyes reflecting your car headlights.




-- J.S.
  • 0

#3 Ian Coad

Ian Coad
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 March 2010 - 03:27 AM

thats pretty much what i thought, which is why i feel like i have to wrap my head around what cronenweth did: http://www.scifitv.c..._525/blade4.jpg

the relationship of that bright light close to camera, yet not overpowering the rest of the light shaping the faces
  • 0

#4 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 March 2010 - 11:06 AM

thats pretty much what i thought, which is why i feel like i have to wrap my head around what cronenweth did: http://www.scifitv.c..._525/blade4.jpg

the relationship of that bright light close to camera, yet not overpowering the rest of the light shaping the faces


Once you know the trick, it's really not all that hard to do because the light needed isn't all that bright if it's perfectly on the lens axis. For Blade Runner, a rig was built that is essentially the same as a teleprompter. A sheet of glass or half-silvered mirror is positioned at 45 degrees to the lens. A light is aimed 90 degrees to the lens axis so that it reflects off of the glass and straight down the lens axis. I've done it in lower light levels, fairly close to the talent with a 1x1 lite panel and a sheet of plain glass.
  • 0

#5 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 March 2010 - 02:05 AM

Good idea. You could also use a fully silvered mirror with a hole in it for the lens. Have a glass shop cut it for you, or use a plastic mirror.



-- J.S.
  • 0

#6 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 March 2010 - 03:24 AM

http://www.cinematog...hl=teleprompter
  • 0

#7 Keith Walters

Keith Walters
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2219 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:42 PM

for a long time i've been wanting to know how to get that 'red eye' effect that you see in tons of low quality consumer-grade photographs, often from disposable cameras. this effect showed up in blade runner (the owl) and in some of the replicants eyes. mark romanek's music video for fiona apple, 'criminal' recreated the disposable camera effect - light over the camera, lots of fall off, red eyes.

i red something about it on wikipedia mentioning that it had to do with the fact that with flash photography the iris in the human eye doesn't have time to close before the flash goes off, so light bouces off the back of the eye and is reflected back towards camera.

any suggestions of how to do this?

There are quite a few problems involved here.
First of all, the Wikipedia is correct in that the “red eye” effect from cheap stills cameras comes from the flash going off while the irises of the subjects’ eyes are still wide open. More up-market cameras simply shine a light in the subjects’ eyes to close their irises down a bit before the flash goes off. (Some cameras attempt to achieve this by firing the flash a couple of times before the picture is actually taken, but the trouble with this is that the subjects often drop their pose after the first flash!)

With motion pictures, this effect cannot easily be achieved, because the light needed to produce the red-eye phenomenon will of course cause the subjects’ irises to close up. Also, by the time most people reach their 30s, the amount their irises open up in low light starts to progressively reduce. By the time they reach their mid-50s the irises remain almost permanently closed down, which is one reason why older people find night driving more difficult.

One way of overcoming these problems is to simply hire or otherwise persuade an ophthalmologist to administer a couple of drops of the atropine muscle relaxant they use to the actors’ eyes. This will make their irises open up fully and remain unresponsive to the light level. (They will need to wear sunglasses until the drops wear off). You might be able to simply obtain the drops and have the on-set nurse administer them, if one is available. They did this on an episode of “Mythbusters” once, so there appears to be no legal obstacle, and these drops are widely used as part of eye examination procedures.
Once the irises are opened up, any point-source light such as a single-LED flashlight should produce the effect.
  • 0

#8 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 March 2010 - 01:51 AM

or give em an E :blink:
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Technodolly

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies