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Making Stove Plu


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#1 Jase Ryan

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 03:06 AM

Can anyone tell me how to properly make a stove plug with some C-Way? I have C-Way and an old electric stove from which I can cut the plug. I'm not sure how this should properly be fixed together. Any info or step by step instructions would be great. Thank You.
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#2 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 06:09 AM

Step one: open up google/your yellow pages.

Step Two: search for a qualified, licenced electrician in your area.

Step Three: get it done by them.

If you have to ask on an Internet forum you shouldn't be doing this. Electricity can, has and will kill.
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#3 Guy Holt

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 10:26 AM

Can anyone tell me how to properly make a stove plug with some C-Way? I have C-Way and an old electric stove from which I can cut the plug. I'm not sure how this should properly be fixed together. Any info or step by step instructions would be great. Thank You.



What are you trying to accomplish with the contraption that you want to build. If you will tell us, we can tell you if there is a safer way to do it.

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Boston, Ma
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 12:53 PM

What's "C-Way"? I've never heard that term before.

The big issue with stove plug rigs is getting both ground and neutral. If the plug has three pins instead of four, fuggedaboudit.




-- J.S.
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#5 Guy Holt

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:57 PM

If the plug has three pins instead of four, fuggedaboudit.


If the plug has three pins instead of four, don’t “fuggedaboudit.” Wire your three pin stove plug to a step down transformer. The safe and legal way to pull power from a three wire 240V stove outlet that meets the requirements of the National Electrical Code is to run your lighting load through a 240v-to-120v step down transformer. A transformer converts the 240 volts supplied by industrial and household 240V receptacles back to 120 volts in a single circuit that is the sum of the two legs of the circuit. For instance, a transformer can make a 60A/120v circuit out of a 30A/240v dryer circuit that is capable of powering bigger lights, like a 5k or 4k HMI. What makes it safe to plug a step town transformer into three wire 240V outlets is that the transformer automatically splits the load of whatever you plug into it evenly over the two legs of the 240V circuit so that you have 100 percent phase cancellation. In other words, where there is no high leg, the loads on each leg of the 240V circuit completely cancel out and there is no return that would require a separate neutral (the missing fourth wire in a three wire system.) A step down transformer can also be used on 4-wire 240V circuits as well as 3-wire circuits.

You can use this link for more details about using step-down transformers on set: . By giving you access to more house power through common 240V house outlets, a transformer can quite
often eliminate the need for tie-ins or generators.

- Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip ,www.screenlightandgrip.com
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 07:39 PM

OK, what are the price, weight, and Amp or V-A ratings for the stove plug transformer? Do you bond the secondary's neutral to ground?



-- J.S.
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#7 Guy Holt

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 10:42 AM

OK, what are the price, weight, and Amp or V-A ratings for the stove plug transformer? Do you bond the secondary's neutral to ground?


Where it would be inappropriate for me to use this forum for marketing a product, I will only answer those questions by email. What I can say is that the use of a small transformer (whether one of ours or one you pick up locally) on a stove/dryer outlet or 240V output of portable gas generator offers benefits that far outweigh it. Besides isolating harmonic currents from the power supply, a step down transformer plugged into a 240V receptacle (house or generator) will give you access to the full capacity of that circuit in a single 120V circuit. For instance, for the tests I describe in my article I tapped a 240V circuit designed into the Honda EU6500is generator for the UK market and used a step down transformer to convert it into a 7500W/120V circuit capable of powering larger lights. A transformer makes it possible for a generator to operate larger lights than it could otherwise because it automatically splits the load of whatever you plug into it evenly over the two legs of the generator’s 240V circuit. In effect, it reduces the impact of switching on a large Tungsten light (like a 5k) or striking a large HMI (like a 4k) with 120V magnetic ballast. By automatically splitting the high front end striking load of these lights into two smaller perfectly balanced loads, a transformer makes the load more manageable for the generator.

Besides creating a 120V circuit capable of powering larger lights, I have found that step down transformers also enable you to run more smaller lights on a generator than you could without it. You can run more lights with a transformer because it enables you load the generator more fully. With out a transformer you can never fully utilize the available power of a portable generator because the load of a light has to go on one circuit/leg of the generator or the other. For example, when plugging lights into the power outlet panel of a Honda EU6500is Generator, you reach a point where you can't power an additional 1kw light because there is not 8.4 amps available on either one of the factory installed 20A outlets/leg of the generator. With a transformer you can still add that 1kw light because the transformer will split the load evenly over the two legs (4.2A/leg) of the generator.

If the lighting package consists predominantly of HMIs and Kinos with Power Factor Corrected (PFC) ballasts, a transformer on an inverter generator will enable you to operate more of these lights on a portable generator than has ever been possible before. Where the harmonic distortion created by non-PFC ballasts reacting poorly with the distorted power waveform of conventional AVR generators, limited the number of HMIs you could use to a third of the generators capacity. With the aid of a transformer, an inverter generator can be loaded to capacity with PFC HMI and Kino Flo ballasts because the near-linear nature of these loads and the extremely low harmonic distortion (less than 2.5%) of the original AC power waveform of inverter generators results in virtually no distortion of the power waveform. 

With a transformer and PFC ballasts, you can safely power bigger HMI lights, or more smaller HMI lights, on an inverter generator than has ever been possible on a conventional portable gas generator.

Whether plugged into a range/dryer receptacle or the 240V outlet of a portable generator, a transformer will also greatly simplify your set electrics. As long as you plug lights in through the transformer, you no longer have to carefully balance the load over the circuit's two 120V legs because the transformer does it for you automatically. If you outfit the transformer with a 60 Bates receptacle, you can use 60A GPC extension cables, 60-to-60 Splitters, and fused 60A GPC-to-Edison Breakouts (snack boxes) to run power around set - breaking out to 20A Edison outlets at convenient points. The best part about using a transformer in this fashion is that no matter where in the distribution system you plug in, the transformer automatically balances the additional load on the generator, so that you don't have to.

Another advantage to using a transformer with a portable generator is that it enables you to place the generator further away while your plug-in points remain conveniently close to set. The Honda EU6500is Inverter generator is so quiet, that to record sync sound without picking up any generator noise, all you need to do is add 200' of heavy duty 250V twist-lock cable between the generator and the transformer (which is usually enough cable to place the generator around the corner of a building.) Using a heavy duty 250V twist-lock cable in this fashion also eliminates multiple cable runs to the generator. And if you use a boost transformer like the one we customize for our modified Honda EU6500is generator, the transformer will assure that you have full line level (120V) on set by compensating for the slight line loss you will have over an extended cable run. That is, because a boost transformer is designed to slightly boost the voltage on the load side (secondary) so that if you were to feed the supply side (primary) of the transformer 240 volts from the generator, 127 volts would come out on the secondary side where you plug in the lights. This slight boost enables you to place the generator even further from set where you are sure not to hear it, yet assure that the supply voltage on set does not drop too low.

Some may argue that transformers are not only bulky and noisy, but also totally unnecessary in this age of power efficient Fluorescent and LED light sources. I use transformers to power bigger HMIs (2.5-4Kw) in situations where smaller lights simply don’t cut it – for balancing the sun on day exteriors or for bringing a large “sun” source in a window on a day interior. Where the production budget is particularly tight, I use a package consisting of two transformers and a portable generator. I use one transformer to access more power through a 240V circuit on location to run lights inside; while the other I use to bring larger HMIs in the windows from outside. This approach
eliminates the need for a dangerous tie-in or expensive tow generators, it also greatly reduces the amount of cable that has to be run.

For those who would like to see samples of what can be accomplished with this basic package, I have attached these links to production stills of the PBS and History Channel historical documentaries shot entirely, or in part, with just a couple of transformers and a Honda generator.

American Experienes Typhoid Mary Biography "The Most Dangerous Women in America": www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/tmintro.html

WGBH’s Ben Franklin Biography “Franklin”:
www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/franklinintro.html

The History Channel’s “Unsolved History” episode “Presidential Assassins” : www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/unhisintro.html

- Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip
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#8 JD Hartman

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 11:34 AM

Where it would be inappropriate for me to use this forum for marketing a product, I will only answer those questions by email. - Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip


The questions were simple technical ones, nothing regarding marketing. You neatly sidestep the questions, while once again reminding all who read this forum that your company rents and sells the P&P package. If that's not marketing what is?
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#9 Guy Holt

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 03:26 PM

The questions were simple technical ones, nothing regarding marketing.


I thought it inappropriate to answer the questions because they were specific to a particular product we sell and the information requested somewhat proprietary. And what is "technical " about the price.

You neatly sidestep the questions, while once again reminding all who read this forum that your company rents and sells the P&P package. If that's not marketing what is?


I never mentioned that we sell or rent transformers customized for motion picture production until John asked about our product specifically. Even then, my responses were in regard to the use of transformers in motion picture production in general and not about our product specifically. According to your logic I could never post as a gaffer on a question regarding lighting craft because I sell and rent lights - it makes no sense.

- Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Boston
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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 04:48 PM

The OP has the plug, and was looking for a way to use it. So, I was thinking more of an OEM transformer than a finished product -- maybe something like this:

https://images.trade...00001_12_12.pdf

Of course, that's just the first reasonable sounding thing I found via Google. But the prices on that PDF run in the grand or two range, so buying a transformer to use with your existing plug is kinda like buying a car because you have six quarts of motor oil. ;-)






-- J.S.
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