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Books and Movies for Newbies


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#21 Tom Jensen

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 03:54 PM

Adventures with D. W. Griffith, New York, 1973. Karl Brown. Must read.
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#22 Branko Pasic

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 06:29 AM

Hi,

I'm looking for one book called Visual effects cinematography, author: Zoran Perisic. If somebody have it in pdf format, please send it to me (bane_pa@yahoo.com).
thnx, thnx!!!
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#23 Matt M

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 09:55 PM

What about anything by Roger Corman? Robert Lippert? Bert I. Gordon? Sandy Frank? ha ha ha

yes I still watch old episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000...


I was going to say... Roger Corman isn't exactly who'd I'd look to for GREAT cinematography. But The Gunslinger was one of his better ones.

I've always enjoyed THX-1138
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#24 Ansis Imaks

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 01:27 AM

I foud this one wery high value: The Visual Story - creating the visual structure of film, tv and digital media - Second Edition - 2008 - by Bruce Block
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#25 WaiHoong

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 04:05 AM

I've read Blain Browns book to shreds, i love that one. The negative aspects of the book are the terrible quality of the filmstills and strange typos and mistakes in calculations. You have to watch out for those.


i agree!!
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#26 Brandon Whiteside

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 07:37 PM

I did not get a chance to read the entire post. I am looking for a book that will help me with exposure, film stops, and how to properly use a meter. I know a lot of aspects of setting lights and I am now interested in focusing on the "Film" aspect. Can anyone recommend a book from the list?
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#27 Jenna Whitney

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 06:17 AM

I really like Film, Form, and Culture w/ DVD-ROM by Robert Phillip Kolker with the accompanying DVDs, my teacher showed a few clips in school and now I'm addicted. At the time it was a cold day in Manhattan and I was just kind of salvating over the sunny palm tree lined campus it was shot on in North Carolina.

Does anyone know any good books for location lighting? I have some general books on film lighting but was wondering if you know of any that are good for lighting deserts, valleys, mountains, etc.
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#28 Nic Burn

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 02:29 PM

i know basically nothing about this industry as a whole.
so can anyone recomend a book that is not only great for cinematography but addresses other aspects, equipment and jobs, what they do and how everything mixes together?
starting from the very beginning.

Thanks,
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#29 Corey Sullivan

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 01:17 PM

There is a difference between a technical manual / reference guide and a textbook -- the second is meant to be read as a book, the first is meant to use for reference, though the ASC Manual does mix in articles with the charts and whatnot.

Certainly if you are a shooter, a reference guide like the ASC Manual is worth owning. When I was a film student, I picked up a used version from 1980 that was quite fun to flip through.

I find that "intermediate" level textbooks on cinematography tend to go beyond technical issues (at that point, better covered in technical manuals) and concentrate on real-world experiences of professionals. They tend to be interview books. Truth is that once you get beyond the basics of photography, most of the challenges of cinematography tend to be artistic and logistical more than technical.


Good point...A tech manual is helpful but no one would want to sit down and read it cover to cover....try the textbook style for a general overview.

Corey
www.indie-film-production-san-francisco.com
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#30 John Sprung

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 06:17 PM

Despite the name, this site is actually a very useful reference:

http://www.trailersfromhell.com/

There are trailers for over 400 movies here, an eclectic collection of classics and crap.





-- J.S.
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#31 chris reynolds

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Posted 17 October 2010 - 06:25 AM

If you are looking for a book that shows easy to follow lighting set ups (put your key here and this the result, put your fill there and this is what will happen, etc) then Film Lighting by Kris Malkewicz is the one

imho
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#32 Mihai Nicolau

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:45 AM

Can somebody please recommend some books concerning 3D technology and cinematography ?
Thanks
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#33 Thangjam Bicky Chengleicha

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 10:40 AM

are there any books based on xdcam sxs format camcorder cinematography books?
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#34 Jim Carlile

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 02:26 AM

Adventures with D. W. Griffith, New York, 1973. Karl Brown. Must read.


Absolutely. And he was discovered by Kevin Brownlow, too.
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#35 Joe Zakko

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 05:13 PM

These books cover filmmaking topics other than cinematography

'making movies' by sidney lumet-great book on direction and storytelling

'the dark side of the screen'-Foster Hirsch-really good book on film noir's style and roots

'Rebel without a crew'-Robert Rodriguez-story of how robert rodriguez got el mariachi made on a 7k budget, and got recognized, real good 'do it yourself' tips


They're not all necessarily completely about cinematography, but very important general topics regardless of what you do behind the camera.
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#36 Daniel Molina

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 06:26 AM

Hi, I'm new here and I'll try to contribute with things that I know.

I'm actually reading "Days of the camera" of Nestor Almendros. I just have read the half of the book and I could say that is a great book because he talks about how he started doing films and he explains each one of the movies that he had done. He talks a lot about directors, producers and different ways of doing films (french one and north american).

I hope this will help someone.

Daniel.
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#37 Gin Bourne

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 07:54 AM

It's actually called Living In Oblivion.

I just finished it last week, it's really funny . The one is in my Top 10 list.
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#38 Ewan Lumsden

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:30 PM

Wow! There's so many... :)
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#39 Paweł Kończyński

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 06:10 PM

Hello there! I'm a photographer self-educating myself to become a cinematographer myself. So far I've been lurking in online tutorials/blogs getting familiar with basics of filmmaking and studying scripwriting/storytelling from books. I'm also trying to watch lots of films consciously analysing shots and technical aspects of craft.

What I'm troubled to find is knowledge about practical workflow of production - what are the typical camera angles and moves, what are some patterns I can creatively build from while shooting video? I want to start with some documentary style interviews, music videos, promotional videos progressing forward to more ambitious things like short movies.

So after this longish introduction my question is: AS for 2015 and an age of digital cinematography, have the 'bible' books changed or I should start with those oldies goldies that wers mentioned at the beginning of this thread? Also IF anyone has links to interesting knowledge available online, I'd be more than grateful IF he or she could share!

Hugs from Poland! :)
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#40 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 07:32 PM

I'd say if you are really interested in a subject, you're eventually going to read most of these books, old or not.  One of my favorites is "Practical Motion Picture Photography" by Russell Campbell (1970):

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/0498078019

 

Even though a lot of the practices and tools are now out of date, I'm such a fan of 1960's British cinematography that reading a textbook that quotes cinematographers like Ozzie Morris or Freddie Francis gives me some insight into how they thought and worked.

 

Not that I'd recommend that book as the first book on cinematography you read, you'd get confused as to what was still relevant and what was obsolete.

 

Any of the cinematography textbooks would give you the basics about exposure, lenses, etc.  As for camera moves or lighting, there are books that deal more with the directing aspect or the lighting aspect.  To some degree, you can learn that by watching movies and breaking down what you see and like into its components and then trying to recreate them yourself -- that's often the best way to learn, by doing.  Then a book can tell you sometimes if you are on the right track.


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Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Opal

Metropolis Post

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FJS International, LLC