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Giving a director a script.


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#1 George Ebersole

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:56 PM

I have an acquaintance on another website whose written a fairly outstanding period piece. I contacted a director I used to work for many years back and asked if would like to read it. He said yes, thank goodness.

Has anyone here had similar opportunities, and if so, how did you go about introducing the work you found to capable hands?

I ask because I feel I got lucky this time around, and am wondering what the usual procedure is for this kind of thing.
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#2 George Ebersole

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 06:06 PM

Nobody, huh?

I've got nearly 40 people looking at this thread, and not one of you has ever tossed a script to a director?

Interesting.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 07:28 PM

I'd say it's a friendly thing at least out here. you meet people and sometimes those moments come along when it's like, woah, this would be perfect for mr or ms x who really loves y! You give 'em the script and the contact of the person who wrote it and hope they cut you in on a case of beer later on. And, if you're lucky, often they'll push for you to be on the project somehow.
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#4 George Ebersole

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Posted 28 March 2010 - 10:00 AM

Thanks Adrian.
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#5 Keneu Luca

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:17 AM

Depends on how well you know the director.

My opinion on this, if they are just an acquaintance, but not good friends to the point where you both completely trust each others intentions and judgment, I'd feed them little bits at a time.

First just contact them and say you have a strong script and give them the log line, nothing else. Dont bog them down with too much info all at once unless they ask for more. Directors are usually busy people, even between projects.

Then the next time you speak or email them, send a brief synopsis. Finesse your opinions as to why the script is strong and why you think that director is good for the project. Keyword being finesse.

Then a treatment.

Then script.

But if they are less than an acquaintance, and barely know who you are, I'd say you need to go through a mutual friend.

Edited by Keneu Luca, 30 March 2010 - 02:18 AM.

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#6 George Ebersole

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 11:29 PM

Thanks Keneu. Yeah, using the common sense approach works best :)
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#7 Sean Halket

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 03:47 PM

Nobody, huh?

I've got nearly 40 people looking at this thread, and not one of you has ever tossed a script to a director?

Interesting.

Well, I usually just direct my own screenplays due to the fact that by the time I've finished it I would never trust another director to make it for me. I'd probably end up directing the whole thing if I hired a director.
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