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Burger King Commericial - Canon 7D


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#1 Matt Workman

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 11:39 PM

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Burger King Commercial
"Spring Break 2010"
Acapulco, Mexico. 2010

Director: E.J. McLeavey-Fisher
http://www.ej-mf.com

Director of Photography: Matt Workman
http://www.mattworkman.com

Shot on the Canon 7D with Canon L Series Zooms. Used a custom Arri, Redrock, Marshall, and Zacuto rig. Colored on Apple Color.

Half of the shoot was run and gun chasing the King around and the other half we had time to set up. I think it's pretty obvious which parts are which.

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Cheers,

Matt
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 09:08 AM

Must've been warmish in the King outfit...

P
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 09:45 AM

Am I the only one who is utterly terrified by some of those "King," spots... like the one where he's in your bedroom?

Aside from that, nice looking spot.
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#4 Daniel Madsen

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 11:05 PM

if you're into corporate propaganda......
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#5 Richard Boddington

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 02:17 PM

if you're into corporate propaganda......


What commercial isn't?

R,
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#6 Keith Walters

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 09:51 PM

Well I think this is just fantastic.
At last, the little guys get a chance to play on a slightly more level playing field.
The day has finally arrived where small struggling Mom and Pop operations like Burger King, McDonald's, KFC, Pizza Hut Taco Bell etc can get their slice of the HD pie!
After years of being sneered at, spat upon, having cigar smoke blown in their faces etc by the obscenely monied owners of Red One and HVX systems, as they begged for a few crumbs of camera time in between all the glamorous spec music videos, regional ads, rural cable pilots and all the other glistening sumptuous plums of creativity hogged by all you devotees of wasted excess.
Ha! The tables are starting to turn at long last. The 7D and 5D are going to at last smash through the crimson ceiling and bring HD to the masses. All you bloated and overfed Red One owners are gonna have to seriously consider reconsidering your lifestyles.
Honeymoon's over guys! Soon there’ll be no more 44D bimbos for you, more like 42D or maybe even 40D! You’ll be trading in your Mercs for Lexus’s soon enough. So much for your schemes of retiring at 39; it'll be more like 43 now, and as like as not as not, to the NORTH of France!
As they say, good things come to those who wait.
Or bellhop.
Or deliver Pizza

Edited by Keith Walters, 09 June 2010 - 09:52 PM.

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#7 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 03:05 PM

Well I think this is just fantastic.
At last, the little guys get a chance to play on a slightly more level playing field.


It really is a race to the bottom. People and business big and small will generally always choose to save money at the expense of some (perceived) quality. Film is already a dinosuar to most people out there . . .

What seems crazy to me is that people like Jim Jannard, for example, refuse to acknowledge that their (pricier) highly compressed RAW cameras (in the case of RED ONE) will be at a disadvantage against the DSLR offerings, line skipping, and other artifacts notwithstanding. Other manufacturers are on the same boat as well, of course. The trend points at under $2K 1080p large sensor DSLR bodied cameras that record HD, take stills and record sound compromising quality over versatility.

For RED (and other established camera manufacturers), it seems they could compete in this market if they released a non-RAW Scarlet type camera with large sensor and other options (consumer DSLR lens mounts, hdmi/comp/hd sdi monitoring, etc). The longer they wait to release this camera, the sooner they will get a foothold on this newly emerging market: The "everyone is a (high-end) film maker" world.

I'm expecting cellphones with professional lens mounts on them soon, as there have been some with 10mp sensors on the market for a while now.
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#8 Keith Walters

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 07:27 PM

It really is a race to the bottom. People and business big and small will generally always choose to save money at the expense of some (perceived) quality. Film is already a dinosuar to most people out there . . .

What seems crazy to me is that people like Jim Jannard, for example, refuse to acknowledge that their (pricier) highly compressed RAW cameras (in the case of RED ONE) will be at a disadvantage against the DSLR offerings, line skipping, and other artifacts notwithstanding. Other manufacturers are on the same boat as well, of course. The trend points at under $2K 1080p large sensor DSLR bodied cameras that record HD, take stills and record sound compromising quality over versatility.

For RED (and other established camera manufacturers), it seems they could compete in this market if they released a non-RAW Scarlet type camera with large sensor and other options (consumer DSLR lens mounts, hdmi/comp/hd sdi monitoring, etc). The longer they wait to release this camera, the sooner they will get a foothold on this newly emerging market: The "everyone is a (high-end) film maker" world.

I'm expecting cellphones with professional lens mounts on them soon, as there have been some with 10mp sensors on the market for a while now.

Jim seems to be proud of the fact that “They don’t know what they’re doing,” and this case just proves that he’s right!
You have to understand the whole package, not just the equipment. Every cent that the production company doesn't spend is money in somebody's pocket!
Some of them can be real tightasses!
In Australia, very few projects ever had a dedicated Video Assist operator; so it was normal practice for production companies to rent a VHS combo for video assist playback, as like as not, handled by whoever wasn’t doing anything else at the time!
When I worked for Sammys/Panavision Sydney we used to rent out a lot of these, and it was normal practice to reuse the same cassette over and over again rather than supplying a new one each time .
When I complained that this meant that they were using the first hundred feet or so of the tape over and over which meant it was rapidly wearing out and using a lot a blocked heads and so on, I was told that this problem had come up numerous times, but production companies refused to fork out $4 or so for a new VHS tape!
So I said, well why don’t we just put in a new tape each time and just make it part of the rental package?
Ah no, was the reply. Because THEN they’ll point out that they returned the tape and so they’ll want a $4 discount!
At one time we used to have “courtesy” rolls of gaffer tape in the test bays, but we had to stop that because people kept knocking them off.
We had to put a toll bar on the test bay phone.
I think my favourite job was the Sci-Fi series “Farscape” when they were shooting that in Sydney (Know informally as “Cheapscape”).
They had a huge number of monitors because of all the Muppet operators used but their budget only ran to a single Video Distribution amplifier. So every time the B unit were shooting, they had to unplug all the cables from the ”A” set monitors take the VDA over to the “B” set !
Ironically, I tried to tell the f*ckwit doing the video that the expensive VDA they were renting was a full broadcast unit, vastly over-rated for simple picture monitoring, and that for a couple of day’s rental they could BUY a couple of Home Video type units which would be more than adequate for that simple task. But he wouldn’t hear of it, because the cheap units “don’t have BNC connectors”. Even though the cheap monitors they were using all had phono type video inputs and they were using those ghastly BNC to RCA adaptors which wreck phono sockets in no time.
So people will pay for quality if the feel it's really necessary. Whether it really is or not is another question.

Edited by Keith Walters, 10 June 2010 - 07:29 PM.

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