Jump to content


Photo

Most badass PC for video editing


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 meno moje

meno moje

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 March 2010 - 01:49 PM

Hi there

I plan on buying a new PC for video editing and dont know whats the best option's out there these days, since Im not a hardware nerd :)

Can I get anything decent for about 1300 euro?

What are the most important components I should care about/buy?

I'd need something that would run as much smoothly as possible, so I dont have to worry about things being slow, within nowadays technology options {and my budget}.


Thanks alot for your suggestions!!!
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 28 March 2010 - 01:58 PM

Depends what you're cutting on. If you're working with AVID, get one of their approved computers; anything else, well focus on RAM, and graphics cards first, and processors are a bit of an afterthought. The more RAM you can get the better. You'll also want at least 2 hard drives, 1 for program files, and one at least for media files. A lot of people do this with outsie boxes, but I find an internal drive to work just as well most of the time and for most smaller editing situations.

Personally, i just cut everything on a macbook pro, which works well enough for me.
  • 0

#3 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 28 March 2010 - 02:06 PM

What Adrian said. Also, the more mobo, SATA 3.0 plug points, the better. Think about getting a mobo with a direct USB 3.0 port.
  • 0

#4 meno moje

meno moje

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 March 2010 - 07:43 PM

Thanks for the replies?
So how much RAM/maximum can I pump into nowadays PC's?

What Adrian said. Also, the more mobo, SATA 3.0 plug points, the better. Think about getting a mobo with a direct USB 3.0 port.


What for do I need these mobo usb plug things?
  • 0

#5 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 28 March 2010 - 08:33 PM

As I understand it, you can cram 16 Gig of RAM on some of the newest boards running WOS 7. Vista is supposed to do it but has turned out to be a dubious OS. USB 3.0 is the latest thing in peripheral ports coming right out the back with the rest of the plug points. It runs 10 times faster than USB 2.0. Great thing is, it runs all the lesser USB systems on the same plug point. There's some buzz that a USB 3.1 running at 14 times speed is on the near horizon.

I haven't done any research on this particular board and can't recommend it. But, it sure looks pretty bad-ass to me:

http://www.tigerdire...p;Sku=A455-2869
  • 0

#6 meno moje

meno moje

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 March 2010 - 10:19 PM

As I understand it, you can cram 16 Gig of RAM on some of the newest boards running WOS 7. Vista is supposed to do it but has turned out to be a dubious OS. USB 3.0 is the latest thing in peripheral ports coming right out the back with the rest of the plug points. It runs 10 times faster than USB 2.0. Great thing is, it runs all the lesser USB systems on the same plug point. There's some buzz that a USB 3.1 running at 14 times speed is on the near horizon.

I haven't done any research on this particular board and can't recommend it. But, it sure looks pretty bad-ass to me:

http://www.tigerdire...p;Sku=A455-2869



Thanks for your input!

Could anyone give a recommendation regarding 24-27" monitors? Im looking for something thats reliable and capable of 1920 x 1080 at at least 75 hz. Or is there anything else about them I should care about?

Edited by meno moje, 28 March 2010 - 10:20 PM.

  • 0

#7 Chris Bowman

Chris Bowman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 06 April 2010 - 10:58 PM

I hate to disagree with Adrian, but I think CPU is far more important than RAM. This is mostly because, to the best of my knowledge, all of the Windows NLEs are only capable of addressing a maximum of 4GB of RAM (in 64 bit, only 3GB in 32 bit). AE can run multiple background instances, with each instance addressing up to 4GB, but this is useless unless you also have a dedicated CPU core for each instance as well. Also, this limitation includes the memory on the GPU. Supposedly, this will be incresed in CS5 and Vegas 10. (But don't they always say it'll be ready in the next version?)

A decent Quad Core CPU is a very cost effective way to improve performance. The Intel Core I7 has a pretty substantial edge currently.

Everything else that has been said, I agree with, but DON'T buy a dual core CPU and 16GB of RAM and expect great performance. It's better to get the quad core and 8GB RAM than a dual core and 16GB.

Also, FYI, Windows 7 can address up to 128GB of RAM, according to Microsoft. Finding 16GB sticks to load up an 8 slot server board might be a challenge, though.
  • 0

#8 Chris Bowman

Chris Bowman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 06 April 2010 - 11:06 PM

For the record. I'm not saying don't get 16GB+ of RAM, only don't sacrifice a decent CPU to do it.
  • 0

#9 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 06 April 2010 - 11:08 PM

Hey disagreements are totally allowed. Was unaware of the RAM addressing limitations in 64bit, just 32bit. Good to know.
  • 0

#10 Chris Bowman

Chris Bowman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 07 April 2010 - 12:49 AM

If I've got all of my facts straight (with bits gathered hither, thither, and yonder) it was a limitation of XP 64 bit that no individual instance of a program could address more than 3GB (Default was 2 but could be changed by altering BOOT.INI). Vista added the ability to address blocks of 4GB or more per instance, but addressing more than 4GB caused memory leak issues, so was capped at 4GB by most programmers. Windows 7 has supposedly fixed the memory leak issue, but no one has coded for it yet as far as I'm aware.

Also remember that you can't have your NLE using all the RAM, gotta leave 1GB or so for Windows itself, and extras for all the other background stuff, like anti-virus, Photoshop, and whatever else you may be using on a given day. So, lots of RAM is still a good thing. ;)
  • 0

#11 Bill Gill

Bill Gill

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Digital Image Technician

Posted 05 May 2010 - 05:49 PM

I built a quad core 2.4ghz with 4gb ram to run avid media composer at home. The os is windows xp pro (hence the 4gb limit) but people are seeing real performance improvements with vista business and 8gb ram. If you go down the avid road, budget for an nvidia graphics card (quadro1800 minimum) as avid now takes advantage of 'distributed rendering' which takes the load off the cpu and shares tasking with the graphics card. stick with the quad core as a minimum.

You could probably build this for 1k sterling, but a great resource for diy-ers is the videoguys website, where they have recipes to suit a wide range of budgets.
  • 0

#12 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11941 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 May 2010 - 07:25 PM

focus on RAM, and graphics cards first, and processors are a bit of an afterthought


Very few NLEs or motion graphics tools make other than fairly limited use of graphics hardware. They could, since modern GPUs often have an enormous array of vector processing units which would be ideally suited to tasks such as colour adjustments, but not much makes use of it. If your application of choice does, it will probably trumpet the fact loudly.

Bigger processors help everything.

P
  • 0

#13 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1675 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 06 May 2010 - 10:35 AM

Very few NLEs or motion graphics tools make other than fairly limited use of graphics hardware. They could, since modern GPUs often have an enormous array of vector processing units which would be ideally suited to tasks such as colour adjustments, but not much makes use of it. If your application of choice does, it will probably trumpet the fact loudly.

Bigger processors help everything.

P



which ones do?
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

CineTape

Opal