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poor man's process for daylight


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#1 Sam Kim

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 07:28 PM

i'm shooting a short film where a soldier is in the back seat of a humvee returning to their base.

i have a great location but we're not authorized to actually drive the humvee. i know what i want the light to look like that's coming in and i'm holding the exposure for the interior of the car so the world will get pretty blown out but how can i make it look like they're actually driving? we'll only be looking out the side windows (hopefully) and never the front window (supposedly). i'm not looking for detail to go by the car but i do want texture so that there's a sense of movement.

my thought was to make the PA's run by the windows of the humvee but there has to be a better way. i simpler way without making so much noise. i was also thinking of something giant to spin but that also would be too noisy or too much.

any solutions?

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 09:01 PM

Green screen/motion tracking and rocking the Humvee up and down. Then film some driving scenes someplace and you can composite it in later on.
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#3 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 12:09 AM

Green screen/motion tracking and rocking the Humvee up and down. Then film some driving scenes someplace and you can composite it in later on.


Watch this commercial about 1/2 way in - the CU shots of the driver in blue.


View on Vimeo

It was shot in a parking lot with the car still. Rocked the camera a little. On the side shot of the
driver I had a green screen. I made some motion video and replaced the greenscreen. Did some heavy CC.
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#4 Sam Kim

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 03:26 PM

Green screen/motion tracking and rocking the Humvee up and down. Then film some driving scenes someplace and you can composite it in later on.


thanks, fellas.
green screen and compositing is actually what we're trying to stay away from though.
i'm aware this can be done but with our post capabilities (mainly being time that works against us) i'm trying to find the best way to do it all in camera on set. we have a 5 day turn around and post is being done by those not so good and creating good clean composites.

also, shaking the humvee creates some crazy squeaks and is bad for sound. thinking about shaking the camera op a bit instead but this is something we'll keep testing.

i'm thinking of taking some butcher paper, putting a pattern on it and rolling it by the window. :]

but i'd prefer something less retarded if someone has a recommendation.

cheers, and thanks all.

Edited by Sam Kim, 02 April 2010 - 03:28 PM.

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#5 Michael Nelyapin

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 04:01 PM

i'm thinking of taking some butcher paper, putting a pattern on it and rolling it by the window. :]

What about ground towing your humvee?
But I prefer greenscreen. It's not so hard to remove clear green from image.
Do you recording live sound? What about a little shaking picture virtually on post?
Or forget about "we're not authorized to actually drive the humvee" for a couple of minutes ;)
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 05:44 PM

I fear that for the most part, just moving things in the BG in daylight won't sell it as much as just moving the car, or a green screen. You don't have to shake the car, but it'll help to have the actors moving within the space as well as the space moving. If you just shake the camera, for a bounce, well the actors don't move and jostle, unless you time out "bump" and move actors and cameras at once or something similar. Rolling the car is probably the best bet and easiest way to get a moving background. I'm confused as to why you can't do it?
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#7 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 03:01 AM

Hey Sam!

Are you shooting on film or video? If it's video then I would highly encourage you to shoot green or bluescreen.

Otherwise, doing it practically will be noisy no matter what you do. Best case would be a trailer or tow rig. Simplest would be to get permission to actually drive the Humvee. Most complicated would be some kind of scrolling background rig, lazy Susan, or dolly rig. To create the impression of movement, either the car or the background has to move. You may have to ADR in any case.

Worst case, I'd go with your idea to paper the windows and shake the car, sound be damned. Maybe if you pass the occasional shadow of a "tree" across the papered window with some branches on a doorway dolly, you can sell the movement. It's a lot of choreography though.
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#8 Sam Kim

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 03:42 PM

I fear that for the most part, just moving things in the BG in daylight won't sell it as much as just moving the car, or a green screen. You don't have to shake the car, but it'll help to have the actors moving within the space as well as the space moving. If you just shake the camera, for a bounce, well the actors don't move and jostle, unless you time out "bump" and move actors and cameras at once or something similar. Rolling the car is probably the best bet and easiest way to get a moving background. I'm confused as to why you can't do it?



it's an insurance thing. we're trying to get all kinds of permission but so far nothing is allowed. we can't put it in neutral and let it roll. we're doing our best to be creative about it all.
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#9 Sam Kim

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 03:45 PM

Hey Sam!

Are you shooting on film or video? If it's video then I would highly encourage you to shoot green or bluescreen.



SATUSUKI! damn i miss the bay. i have NOT learned to love LA yet.
anyway... it looks like we'll have to try the green. shooting on the sony ex3.
but i'm worried about the post. it sounds silly to worry about such things BUT it's a valid feeling after a lot of the work i saw so far from editors at my school. even worse... you should see our "adr" booth! lol. just laughable.
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#10 David Woodworth

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 04:53 PM

If you have any sort of access to a video projector, you could simply shoot some travel footage out a window, and then project that in a loop onto a white muslin or similar material. Maybe adjust the brightness and contrast on the projector to get the blown out look you mentioned.
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#11 Sam Kim

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 04:01 PM

If you have any sort of access to a video projector, you could simply shoot some travel footage out a window, and then project that in a loop onto a white muslin or similar material. Maybe adjust the brightness and contrast on the projector to get the blown out look you mentioned.



no projector. i've talked to my team and found the perfect point to stop the vehicle to move and it's towards the beginning of the scene thus... we limit our green screen dance and i am happy.

cheers everyone for the options.
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