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T2i vs. D70 ?


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#1 kyle merryman

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 03:42 AM

i've recently, as in this past weekend, met one person who was filming on the set i'm acting in, using the new EOS Canon Rebel T2i, and he told me the video features of that camera were a carbon copy of the D70, but not the still photo features. and soon after i met someone who plans to buy the T2i for that same reason, the HD video. and OH, the camera is half the cost of the D70, at $899.

does anyone know much about this?
i'm holding out till see what's new at this years NAB next week,
but i can say i'm leaning toward the T2i, for budget reasons.

the cameraman i mentioned was using a lens kit with about 12 various pieces of glass.

wkylem

Edited by kyle merryman, 03 April 2010 - 03:43 AM.

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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 04:42 AM

i've recently, as in this past weekend, met one person who was filming on the set i'm acting in, using the new EOS Canon Rebel T2i, and he told me the video features of that camera were a carbon copy of the D70, but not the still photo features. and soon after i met someone who plans to buy the T2i for that same reason, the HD video. and OH, the camera is half the cost of the D70, at $899.

does anyone know much about this?
i'm holding out till see what's new at this years NAB next week,
but i can say i'm leaning toward the T2i, for budget reasons.

the cameraman i mentioned was using a lens kit with about 12 various pieces of glass.

wkylem


You mean D7, & yes it's true just as the Nikon D90 / D5000 have the same video performance.
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 06:27 AM

YOU mean 7D, ha ha

On paper, they're identical, except the T2i only has one processor, it's a slightly smaller body and the incremental ISO settings are more spread apart. Shoots to SDHC cards too, which is very nice :)
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 08:34 AM

YOU mean 7D, ha ha


Dyslexic!
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 09:42 AM

I discovered that my T2i has no electronic connection that allows you to remote trigger the video, only a simpler connection to trigger the shutter for taking stills.
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:36 AM

Gouge your way in there and fit an external switch across the contacts!

The T2i (or the EOS-550D in this part of the world) has very similar video performance to a 7D. The 7D has really rather good video performance, give or take the usual DSLR caveats. My impression is that the video performance of the D90 is really rather compromised by the fairly slow rolling shutter and that the 7D doesn't do it nearly so badly; also, the Canon has somewhat better colorimetry control with free software. My subjective impression is that the Canon pictures are somewhat nicer, too, although the 7D may have less severe aliasing than the 5D (though so does the 7D).

If it were me, the Canon, no question. The T2i uses SD(HC) cards as opposed to the - in my view - more robust and compatible compactflash media, which would be a downer for me if the D90 didn't have exactly the same problem.


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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:45 AM

Gouge your way in there and fit an external switch across the contacts!

The T2i (or the EOS-550D in this part of the world) has very similar video performance to a 7D. The 7D has really rather good video performance, give or take the usual DSLR caveats. My impression is that the video performance of the D90 is really rather compromised by the fairly slow rolling shutter and that the 7D doesn't do it nearly so badly; also, the Canon has somewhat better colorimetry control with free software. My subjective impression is that the Canon pictures are somewhat nicer, too, although the 7D may have less severe aliasing than the 5D (though so does the 7D).

If it were me, the Canon, no question. The T2i uses SD(HC) cards as opposed to the - in my view - more robust and compatible compactflash media, which would be a downer for me if the D90 didn't have exactly the same problem.


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#8 kyle merryman

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 06:42 PM

YOU mean 7D, ha ha

On paper, they're identical, except the T2i only has one processor, it's a slightly smaller body and the incremental ISO settings are more spread apart. Shoots to SDHC cards too, which is very nice :)



ok, so, in regards to my original question, how does the T2i's incremental ISO and having one processor effect it's image quality compared to the D7's? and how many processors does the D7 have?

thank for your help :-)
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#9 kyle merryman

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 10:40 PM

like a computer, does the processor have more to do with the digital camera's speed, not quality of picture?
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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 06:51 AM

like a computer, does the processor have more to do with the digital camera's speed, not quality of picture?


Precisely.

This is why the T2i/550D doesn't shoot stills as fast as the 7D.
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#11 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 02:31 PM

I discovered that my T2i has no electronic connection that allows you to remote trigger the video, only a simpler connection to trigger the shutter for taking stills.


Well, you can do it with a laptop and the supplied Canon software.
1. Hook up the camera to the computer with the supplied USB cable.
2. Fire up the EOS utility.
3. Click Camera Settings/Remote Shooting.
4. Double click Live view shoot (another screen will pop up showing you the camera's live view.
5. Click the red button in the lower left corner to begin video recording.
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#12 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 11:29 PM

The wireless remote also works:

http://www.cinema5d....hp?f=38&t=11091 :)
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#13 Ram Shani

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:13 AM

a lot of reports says the T2i is overheating like crazy:(
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#14 kyle merryman

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 05:40 PM

a lot of reports says the T2i is overheating like crazy:(



i've read that it does over heat after a 12 minute continuous shoot, but i don't see myself having shot that lasts that long often, not at all.
i realize it's a plastic body, not metal like the D7....so i'm guessing the plastic doesn't deal with the heat as well....
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#15 Jacob David

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 01:02 AM

Many good things have been said about Canon T2i camera.
This is a terrific camera, just as the other reviewers have indicated. I have had more expensive cameras (Nikon D700), but considering value and price, the Canon T2i tops them all. I know the T2i only has a APS-C sized sensor, but the photos look great. The ergonomics of the camera are the best. Controls are easy to use, and you are just a touch away from changing any setting on the camera.
-IMAGE QUALITY: Image quality is amazing. I took some shots of the blossoms on a flowering plum tree and had the photos enlarged to 10x12. They are perfect. The blossoms are sharp, clear, and the colors are right on. Even when you use auto ISO indoors, I find that photos that are enlarged up to 10"x12" are perfect, even at 800 ISO.
-CAMERA QUALITY: The body of the camera is not built like the Nikon D700, which costs over $2,300 and weighs over two pounds. It feels like plastic but doesn't really appear to be cheap. The body only weighs 18.7 ounces, including the battery and card. It feels light-weight without being cheap. The control knobs and buttons have a nice feel, and function well. The camera body is a little small, but I wouldn't go back to the D700.
-LCD MONITOR: The monitor on the Canon T2i is awesome! It has a 3:2 aspect ratio and is 3" wide. It has 1.04 million dots, which means it is very, very sharp. I have used the monitor in the sunlight, and it is still easy to read and exceptionally bright. You can also display the control functions on the screen in four different colors, which is quite nice.
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#16 Jacob David

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:49 AM

I'm a frequent upgrader and loyal Canon fan. I traded up from an XSi last year to the T1i, and now this year to the T2i. I was within days of ordering the 7D until they announced the Canon EOS T2i, with all the features I wanted from the 7D at half the cost. I immediately pre-ordered the T2i and have been having some fun with it over the last 24 hours.
As for what the camera is really made for, still photography, it is still the king at (in the mid-entry-level DSLR class). 18 megapixels really, truly is more than any person really needs. My XSi from a couple years back met all my needs with 12mp, however, 18 creates for even better bragging rights to the general public.
Many good things have been said about this camera
The camera is very small and light. It is not weather-sealed or as durable as some of the more expensive SLRs, but it doesn't "feel cheap" in my opinion. It features a 3-inch LCD (compared to the Rebel XS's 2.5 inch screen), which also has a very high resolution. It looks lovely! Auto-focus is fast, and I've been very pleased with the quality of the pictures and videos I've taken so far.
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