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working on an acid enviroment


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#1 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 05:26 PM

Hi everyone.
in a few days i'm going to work on a intitucional video, and we have to shoot inside of a shed, and the things is that in this place there's a corrosive acid in the air, and corrode metal components, has anyone work on this kind of enviroments, and how did you protect the camera?

Thanks for your help

Daniel Miranda Bianchini
2nd AC
Santiago Chile
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#2 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 07:48 PM

If the potential for corrosion is too great, I'd treat it like it is underwater and get an air-tight camera housing . . . ;)
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#3 Marque DeWinter

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:26 AM

If the potential for corrosion is too great, I'd treat it like it is underwater and get an air-tight camera housing . . . ;)


That won't work because all the environment will do is damage the housing. You could go with a splash bag which is more fabric (mostly rubber). I've done something similar to this once. We used a treated sealed rubber bag wrapped in fabric taken from MOPP gear (the military chemical weapons suits). We bought a large optical flat in front of the lens that again was adheared to the glass directly. Also check with your insurance company that the equipment will still be covered in light of the hazard.

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#4 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 10:42 AM

thanks for the replays, i will try to find some of those rubber.

Daniel Miranda Bianchini.
2nd AC
Santiago Chile
http://www.flickr.co...s/35449016@N08/
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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 01:40 PM

A completely different approach: It's just a shed, use a different location. Decontaminate some of the real chemical equipment, get bottles of colored water instead of real acid. It's safer both for the camera, and for you.




-- J.S.
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 02:23 PM

What's your budget and in what format do you need the deliverables? I'd buy an inexpensive consumer HD camera like a Canon HV-40 planning on throwing it away when done. Wrap it in a plastic bag and have several UV filters to put on the lens so if one gets fouled up you could just pop another one on.

With an HV-40 you could use the Canon wireless remote so you could have the camera pretty much completely covered up. There's a trick to use the remote from the back of the camera. You use a Toslink fiber optics cable to bring the IR signal around from the back to the front of the camera. See http://www.hv20.com/...hread.php?t=364 for instructions on how to rig the Toslink cable.
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#7 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 04:55 PM

well i can't use another location John.

Hal, i will study the posibility of buying an inexpensive camera to do that, in the case i couldn't buy it, well i will try to made a good anticorrosive rubber case for the camera and get many uv filters as posible to protect the lens.
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#8 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 05:03 PM

That won't work because all the environment will do is damage the housing.


Do you have any idea how corrosive salt water is? Professional underwater camera housings are designed to withstand very high levels of corrosive agents. While your idea is a good one, I completely disagree with the notion that underwater camera housings are easily damaged by corrosive agents.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 07 April 2010 - 05:07 PM.

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#9 Marque DeWinter

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 07:48 AM

Do you have any idea how corrosive salt water is? Professional underwater camera housings are designed to withstand very high levels of corrosive agents. While your idea is a good one, I completely disagree with the notion that underwater camera housings are easily damaged by corrosive agents.


Saltwater has a pH around 7 and hydrochloric acid has a pH of 2. I shoot underwater all the time and have a housing for both my canon and my red. A thin splash bag won't cut it in an acid environment. If you want to pull out a full aluminum housing it will do well but they're very heavy, and you can ruin the housing's ability to withstand the pressure at depth with exposure to that environment. So if you want to lose a housing that costs many times more than the camera it would be ok.

~Marque
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#10 Jeremy Hawkins

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 06:16 PM

Saltwater has a pH around 7 and hydrochloric acid has a pH of 2. I shoot underwater all the time and have a housing for both my canon and my red. A thin splash bag won't cut it in an acid environment. If you want to pull out a full aluminum housing it will do well but they're very heavy, and you can ruin the housing's ability to withstand the pressure at depth with exposure to that environment. So if you want to lose a housing that costs many times more than the camera it would be ok.

~Marque


Saltwater is corrosive, but it is due to the salt, not the pH. The pH of saltwater being near 7 means that it is, by definition, neutral, neither acidic nor alkaline. If you are dealing with a corrosive environment coming from the air itself, you are probably shooting a volcano with sulfur dioxide. If you are, what you need to do is keep the camera dry at all times. The sulfur dioxide will become sulfuric acid, but only in the presence of water. After shooting, go over your equipment with a solution of baking soda and water (not a paste, but a dissolved solution)where you can without risking water damage. Whatever rubber O-rings or bushings you can remove, do so and soak them in the same.

People shoot in such environments all the time and generally have little problems.

Check out this review also:

http://www.photovolc...nnersGuide.html
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