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Kodak Introduces New Super 8 Motion Picture Film


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#1 Tim Tyler

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 09:26 AM

Kodak has introduced a new color reversal film available in the Super 8 mm format today. KODAK Ektachrome 100D Color Reversal Film 7285 is a daylight-balanced, 100-speed film incorporating bright saturated colors and fine grain with excellent sharpness.

"Super 8 mm film is a versatile, affordable option for filmmakers who require the image quality and flexibility of film," says Chris Johnson, product manager for Kodak's Entertainment Imaging Division. "Quantum leaps in film emulsion technology have made Super 8 - once considered a hobbyist's format - a viable option for professional filmmakers and students."


Kodak NR logoMany of today's great cinematographers and directors began their careers at the counter of their local photo shop, buying a cartridge of Super 8 film, according to Johnson. But KODAK Ektachrome 100D Color Reversal Film offers filmmakers image quality far beyond that of the familiar home movie format of the 1960s, he says.

"Kodak's commitment to R&D continues to raise the bar for image quality," says Johnson. "One benefit is that Super 8 is now a terrific option for students who want to hone their skills, as well as for professional filmmakers who want to craft a distinctive look for their project."

The Super 8 film format is supported by a network of dedicated laboratories that process and digitize the output. One of the leading labs in the United States supporting the Super 8 format is Pro8MM, located in Burbank, California.

"Our customers have been clamoring for Kodak to offer the 100D product in the Super 8 format," states Phil Vigeant, president of Pro8MM and author of the book "The Power of Super 8." "The results our customers can produce with a Super 8 camera and a 50-foot cartridge of Super 8 film scanned to HD are amazing."

One of the leading facilities in Europe supporting the Super 8 format is Wittner-Cinetec. "The increased saturation of the 100D film makes colors just pop," says company President Daniel Wittner. "We are glad to see Kodak continuing to support this important format."

"We are excited and happy to demonstrate Kodak's continued commitment to film technology, and we look forward to further announcements this year," says Johnson.

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#2 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 06:10 AM

P.S
Can be process at home, in russian spiral processing tanks with E-6 technology and E-6 hobby pack chemisrty.
This is do not complex procedure, can be make at home and you will have a great result.
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#3 Scott Bullock

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 04:16 PM

This is great news. I've been working on a project that has a bunch of flashback sequences in it. We were contemplating whether to use 16mm or Super 8 for these shots. I think we're going to have to run some tests with this new stock to see how it looks. Thanks for the information, Tim.
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#4 Pat Murray

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 09:22 AM

P.S
Can be process at home, in russian spiral processing tanks with E-6 technology and E-6 hobby pack chemisrty.
This is do not complex procedure, can be make at home and you will have a great result.


I have a morse g-3 developer. I've always been told black and white only and colour was too difficult and toxic for home developing. Do you have a link to where I can review the procedure and chemistry? That would be much appreciated. Thank you.

I'm keen to try this new stock and if I can develop it at home, even better.
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#5 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 10:56 AM

One should also mention - in order to gain a complete picture of the Super 8 product range - that 7285 was widely available for years, packaged by Wittner Cinetec and Pro8mm themselves. This is not the launch of a new film stock for S8, but merely Kodak offering an in-house packaged version of a film widely available in Super 8 cartridges.

Furthermore, a very bitter aftertaste is left because without much mentioning, Kodak is actually axing Plus-X 7265. 7265 was by far the most advanced film stock for Super 8, with an outstanding resolving power, excellent contrasts and aesthetically useful monochrome palette. Alot of R&D was done to advance Plus-X from the old 7276 to the current generation of 7265.
This discontinuation is difficult to explain to me, both from a commercial and a cinematographic perspective.

Tri-X 7278 did not see the same effort when it was upgraded to 7266, and although it remains available for the time being, is obviously no alternative for filming once Plus-X is gone, due to the different character.

As is discussed in this thread here, what actually happened on the 6th April 2010 is that Kodak axed two unique film stocks, and introduced one that is already widely available and used in the market in very good manufacturing quality.

Even though media releases jubilate the launch of E-100 as the greatest thing for Super 8 in a while, in actuality, this is the worst blow to the S8 product portfolio since 7268 got axed to great hysteria back in 2005.

-Michael
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#6 robbie Land

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 04:20 AM

I have a morse g-3 developer. I've always been told black and white only and colour was too difficult and toxic for home developing. Do you have a link to where I can review the procedure and chemistry? That would be much appreciated. Thank you.

I'm keen to try this new stock and if I can develop it at home, even better.


i've had no problem processing color film with the G3. success with color neg, reversal and b/w 8mm and 16mm. no links off top of head..perhaps google helen hill's Recipes for disaster or http://www.ralphdick...e/contents.html.
Glad to hear the 100D availabilty via Kodak!
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#7 Pat Murray

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 10:35 AM

i've had no problem processing color film with the G3. success with color neg, reversal and b/w 8mm and 16mm. no links off top of head..perhaps google helen hill's Recipes for disaster or http://www.ralphdick...e/contents.html.
Glad to hear the 100D availabilty via Kodak!



Thanks vey much, Robbie. I've been meaning to purchase Helen Hill's (RIP) book.
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