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50D 7201 aperture question


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#1 Amber Fariss

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 09:00 PM

Hi all!

I'm new to filming in film, but was wondering if the 50D would be alright to film with during daylight hours and not get over exposed or turn out even at all? Unfortunately I don't have a light meter, so I was wondering what would be an appropriate F stop to set it for all day? I'm suppose to be filming tomorrow and I know this is short notice, but hopefully someone will answer my call for help soon haha!

-Amber
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#2 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 10:43 PM

You need a light meter, insist on having one. What kind of school expects you to start with film and not have one?

If you are shooting in direct daylight, it will need to be stopped way down, even with 50D. Try F16 but know your depth of field will be really deep.
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 11:04 PM

You need a light meter, insist on having one. What kind of school expects you to start with film and not have one?

If you are shooting in direct daylight, it will need to be stopped way down, even with 50D. Try F16 but know your depth of field will be really deep.



You need a light meter AND an ND filter (.6 works for me.) This way you can maintain a nice depth of field. Or you may want to use a linear polarizer which will kill two birds with one stone. You usually need to open up at least a stop and a half and you will also get a nice blue sky.

It's a beautiful stock and I plan to shoot my next short on it...provided Kodak doesn't discontinue it! :angry:

Best of luck.
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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 05:12 AM

Expecting you to shoot film without a meter is bit like asking you to write without a pencil. It's a basic tool which you must have.
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#5 Ian Cooper

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 07:53 AM

...Unfortunately I don't have a light meter, so I was wondering what would be an appropriate F stop to set it for all day? I'm suppose to be filming tomorrow and I know this is short notice, but hopefully someone will answer my call for help soon haha!...



What camera are you using?
...some designs feature an internal reflective light meter.

Ok, not the same as a handheld incident meter, but infinately better than trying to guess exposure with no meter at all!
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:09 AM

Hi all!

I'm new to filming in film, but was wondering if the 50D would be alright to film with during daylight hours and not get over exposed or turn out even at all? Unfortunately I don't have a light meter, so I was wondering what would be an appropriate F stop to set it for all day? I'm suppose to be filming tomorrow and I know this is short notice, but hopefully someone will answer my call for help soon haha!

-Amber


the lighting conditions may change, probably will, throughout the day, so keeping one ƒ stop throughout the day isn't that likely. If you shoot in pretty much the exact conditions all day, then maybe you could. Do you know the sunny 16 rule? ƒ16 when you are shooting in direct sunlight and shutter speed is the same or very close to the film speed (ASA), which in your case is 50. Many cameras shoot at or about a 50th, but not knowing what your camera is............
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#7 Amber Fariss

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 12:52 PM

What camera are you using?
...some designs feature an internal reflective light meter.

Ok, not the same as a handheld incident meter, but infinately better than trying to guess exposure with no meter at all!



Thanks for All your suggestions so far! I'm using a Krasnogorsk.
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#8 Ian Cooper

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 02:20 PM

Thanks for All your suggestions so far! I'm using a Krasnogorsk.


Well in theory the K3 has an internal meter.

...in practice many people don't bother putting the (hard to find) battery in it to make it work.
And some people report the K3 meter isn't the best in the world even if/when it does work. Having said that, it's better than no meter at all.
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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 08:03 PM

Expecting you to shoot film without a meter is bit like asking you to write without a pencil. It's a basic tool which you must have.


The "Sunny 16" rule works pretty damned well though outdoors with a more-or-less consistent weather condition.


In fluctuating light, and with the human eye's ability to continuously adapt to changing illumination, it cna be tricky to get the correct stop.


Ansel Adams "guessed" on his famous "Moonrise: New Mexico" shot because he didn't have time to dig his light meter out without the risk of loosing the light.
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#10 J Arnesen

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 11:36 AM

The "Sunny 16" rule works pretty damned well though outdoors with a more-or-less consistent weather condition.


In fluctuating light, and with the human eye's ability to continuously adapt to changing illumination, it cna be tricky to get the correct stop.


Ansel Adams "guessed" on his famous "Moonrise: New Mexico" shot because he didn't have time to dig his light meter out without the risk of loosing the light.




If you have a friend or teacher that has a light meter just ask to borrow it for a short while, then compare your the reading from the borrowed light meter with the reading you get on the K3. If the reading is close or spot on, then you know it works; if it's off, then you know it doesn't work at all. The K3 meter is not that bad, not perfect, but not bad and better than nothing at all. There is an adapter that you can get for the meter's battery, it's at this website
http://www.k3camera.com/k3/k3batt.php, and it works great.
Best of Luck. :rolleyes:
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Glidecam

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Aerial Filmworks

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