Jump to content


Photo

Concidering not using eyelight. cons & pros?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Sjur Pollen

Sjur Pollen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 April 2010 - 09:32 PM

I have a shoot coming up where the main character is withdrawn, alienated, and abusing prescription drugs. She has a very uninspiring job at a conveyor belt in a factory. The light is toppy, flat from the ceiling. Plenty practical fluorescents in a large space, with a high ceiling, working almost like spacelights. This makes for fairly deep shadows in/under her eyes, though the light is, by nature quite flat and thus a little boring.

Now as far as eyelights goes, I'm having trouble deciding to use it or not. Without, she would look duller, and the audience might not quite connect with her as much as with eyeligths. I fear she would sort of loose her personality. Then again, it's her that is withdrawn, not the audience or her coworkers. So I have a hard time deciding.

Later in the script, she start to "live" a little more, the action picks up, and I'm thinking that if I won't use eyelights in the beginning, here would be a great place to start giving her a little more life/sparkle....


Any thoughts?
  • 0

#2 Aaron Moorhead

Aaron Moorhead
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 April 2010 - 11:18 PM

I think that it depends on the your opinion on the role of the audience in the film, as well as the director's. I think that the sadness and loneliness of the character will come out the absolute most in the person's eyes -- the window into the soul. I think we will feel HER disconnectedness if we don't see the eyes, but will feel disconnected from the character ourselves if we don't.

Also, consider knocking out some of the lights at the top in large segments, so there's a bit of light/dark depth in the factory.

Edited by Aaron Moorhead, 09 April 2010 - 11:19 PM.

  • 0

#3 Alex Malm

Alex Malm
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Student
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 13 April 2010 - 11:47 PM

What if you go from a small eyelight early on to a larger one when she becomes more lively. It would be more subtle and you'd have the beauty of eyelights throughout the film.
  • 0

#4 Mei Lewis

Mei Lewis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 16 April 2010 - 02:09 PM

Excuse my ignorance, what is an eyelight? Is it just a light that provides a catchlight in the eyes?

I tried googling but couldn't find a description.

Thanks.
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7373 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 16 April 2010 - 02:15 PM

That's it. Brings they eyes to life, very nice.
  • 0

#6 Etienne van Leeuwen

Etienne van Leeuwen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Amsterdam

Posted 18 April 2010 - 02:38 AM

Later in the script, she start to "live" a little more, the action picks up, and I'm thinking that if I won't use eyelights in the beginning, here would be a great place to start giving her a little more life/sparkle....


My thought also! But, if she's in the factory, does she looks like a zombie? How deep are the shadows going to be? What do you want to achieve in the factory? Deep black shadows with no detail at all?
What is she doing in the factory?

You know "The Machinist"?

Etienne.
  • 0

#7 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5197 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 18 April 2010 - 05:30 AM

I should point out that "The Godfather" didn't use eyelights. You use them as the story dictates and quite often the key is enough without the additional eyelight.
  • 0


Glidecam

Technodolly

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

CineTape

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Technodolly