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#1 George Ebersole

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 06:41 PM

I emailed the RED guys about formal training classes, and the reply I got was that they didn't offer any, but did give informal seminars, and could provide a list of people who offered some kind of hands on training.

Does anyone here know of any official or formal RED classes?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 06:44 PM

I emailed the RED guys about formal training classes, and the reply I got was that they didn't offer any, but did give informal seminars, and could provide a list of people who offered some kind of hands on training.

Does anyone here know of any official or formal RED classes?


Obviousely there are no official RED Classes then! What do you want to learn? How to light or how the camera works?
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#3 Tom Lowe

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 07:00 PM

There was just a big "Reducation" class out in Vegas about a week ago.
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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 07:03 PM

Reducation?? That sounds like a communist re-education camp, which weren't anything to laugh about if one was unlucky to be sent to one.
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#5 Keith Walters

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 09:43 PM

Does anyone here know of any official or formal RED classes?

I have seen ads for various RED courses (they often appear as pop-up ads) but to be brutally honest, when I look at what many the courses consist of, my first thought is always: "Sh!t; if you don't know THAT, are you sure you should be even bothering?"

Basically, most of the same rules that apply the RED, apply to just about any video camera. Once you've learned how to get consistently good pictures with a cheap video camera (one with manual control options that is!) you should be at least three-quarters of the way there with a top-of-theline model. A hands-on course-session could help you get a better basic feel for the camera, but nothing you probably couldn't pick up from the person or place you are renting from. (If you're buying a camera, you shoud be able to figure it all out in your own time of course).

As for the data wrangling, anybody who is reasonably up to speed with modern computers and their peripherals, should be able to work that out with the help of the RED user manuals which you can download for free from the RED website.

As for Post-Production, editing etc, if you don't already know how to do that, sorry, but no weekend course is ever going to help you there.

Sorry if I come across as excessively negative. I just get pi$$ed off all the RED Fanboys constant spruiking that the RED is somehow fundamentally different from other video cameras. It isn't.
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#6 Tom Lowe

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 10:01 PM

Having a basic knowledge of DSLR still photography and post production of RAW images helps a lot.

If you are a DP and you don't yet own a DSLR, get one.
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#7 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 11:30 PM

Since no one is jumping at the opportunity to set the record straight on RED --and someone should-- I will say that RED is revolutionary and it certainly cannot be compared to any other video camera, much, much less a prosumer camera.

It takes many months of kindly embracing portraits of Jim Jannard to even begin to comprehend the magic that RED cameras are capable of producing. It is true, I read that somewhere on RED forum. Oh, and did I mention, one must at least attend one full session of the REDucation course? Why, of course, we get to hear it from the man who single-handedly has liberated film making from the evil clutches of traditional film processes. And by the way, film making from now one should be renamed REDmaking, because film is such an ugly and passé word, much like the technology itself.

I could continue, but I must be off to drown my (film) sorrows in hard liquor. Tomorrow, I attend the REDucation camp!
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#8 George Ebersole

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:14 AM

Thanks all.

I've done camera ops before. Read that as handling an Ikegami, Sony and a few others, and where I've touched and worked around various Arriflexes and Panavision cameras, I've absolutely no formal technical training.

The RED seemed pretty popular, so I figured I'd go check out what classes, if any, were offered.

Thanks again for the replies.
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#9 John Sprung

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:45 AM

There's an active Red users' group here in LA than I think sometimes has classes, or contact info on classes. They have fairly regular meetings, too. Here's where they meet:

http://www.kappastudios.com/




-- J.S.
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 03:10 AM

The Santa Fe Digital Cinematography Workshops runs an advanced workshop that includes RED, amongst other cameras.

http://www.gancietv....at/GTVstore.cgi
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#11 Keith Walters

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 04:16 AM

There's an active Red users' group here in LA than I think sometimes has classes, or contact info on classes. They have fairly regular meetings, too. Here's where they meet:

http://www.kappastudios.com/




-- J.S.

I wonder what happens if you don't click either of these boxes:

Are you a RED owner?
Are you shooting or planning to shoot on RED within a month?

Do you get a MessageBox that says: "Well Piss Off!" :lol:
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#12 Keith Walters

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 04:20 AM

If you are a DP and you don't yet own a DSLR, get one.

Who knows; if you make that a D5/D7, you might well find you don't need the RED at all! :lol: :( :blink: :rolleyes:

Edited by Keith Walters, 24 April 2010 - 04:21 AM.

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#13 Neil Duffy

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 01:23 PM

Keith and Tom,

Excellent advice about practicing with a basic video camera and a RAW DSLR.
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#14 George Ebersole

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 06:45 PM

Is that true for all digital cameras?
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#15 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 02:36 AM

Is that true for all digital cameras?


Perhaps mostly if the camera records RAW and has an associated workflow. The other digital cameras have more traditional video recording and basically work the same as other video cameras.
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#16 George Ebersole

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 11:56 AM

Thanks. As you can tell I've been out of the loop for many years, and need to do some catching up.

One question I do have; are DPs responsible for the working mechanics and electronics of a camera, or are you guys strictly concerned with capturing the image and knowing the tools that can get you the best shot?
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#17 John Sprung

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:22 AM

One question I do have; are DPs responsible for the working mechanics and electronics of a camera, or are you guys strictly concerned with capturing the image and knowing the tools that can get you the best shot?


It can go either way. If you have an experienced film DP who doesn't know all the digital stuff, you bring on a DIT to handle it. On lower budgets, one person has to cover it all.




-- J.S.
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#18 Jay A. Kelley

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 02:53 PM

Thanks. As you can tell I've been out of the loop for many years, and need to do some catching up.

One question I do have; are DPs responsible for the working mechanics and electronics of a camera, or are you guys strictly concerned with capturing the image and knowing the tools that can get you the best shot?


I think the answer to your question is usually all the above. In order to know the best tool, you are going to have to have a strong working knowlege of it.

The RED is a different animal. Everyone will have their own opinions are what they like / don't like. Bottom line: You simply need to learn it for yourself an decide.

Jay
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