Jump to content


Photo

Kitting out a 7d for video...


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Wiliam Andrews

Wiliam Andrews

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 April 2010 - 12:33 PM

I've decided to get myself a Canon 7d for use shooting HD video. I'm wondering what attachments I will need to get my hands on to maximize it's value as a video camera as opposed to a stills camera.

Specifically, what do I get to make it look like this?

And do i need to make it look like this?

Attached Images

  • 9_27_09dan7drig.jpg

Edited by Wiliam Andrews, 25 April 2010 - 12:34 PM.

  • 0

#2 jacob thomas

jacob thomas
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Other

Posted 25 April 2010 - 11:48 PM

I've decided to get myself a Canon 7d for use shooting HD video. I'm wondering what attachments I will need to get my hands on to maximize it's value as a video camera as opposed to a stills camera.

Specifically, what do I get to make it look like this?

And do i need to make it look like this?


looks like a zacuto z finder on the lcd, maybe a Zoom H4 on top for sound, and I'm guess the rest is Genus matte box, rails etc.

The Z-finder was about $400, don't know what the rest cost. Be prepared to spend more on the accessories than the camera if you want your kit to look like this.
  • 0

#3 Trevor Swaim

Trevor Swaim
  • Guests

Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:22 AM

I know it might sound crazy, but perhaps you should learn what all that stuff is and what it does before you get it all kitted out. That way you will actually be able to use that "stuff".
  • 0

#4 Rob Vogt

Rob Vogt
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 26 April 2010 - 08:10 AM

How about an HDMI to HDSDI adapter... A Monitor, Anton Bauer Battery Pack for the monitor and camera. Hot Rod Modded PL Mount. Follow Focus. 4x5 Swing away Mattebox. Filter Set. Noga Arm. Rail System. Lens Support. Carry handle that mounts either to the rods or the lens. Zacuto handheld rig.
  • 0

#5 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 27 April 2010 - 07:41 AM

There is a wireless follow focus in development that talks directly to the autofocus motor in the Canon lenses (no external gearing and/or motor required). They're apparently having some development issues but I think they'll overcome them. If they do successfully bring it to market it will radically change what a tricked-out Canon HDSLR looks like.
  • 0

#6 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

Jason Hinkle (RIP)
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 240 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 05 May 2010 - 03:05 AM

The smart advice is to take all the money you would spend on camera support gear and instead spend that on better quality lenses. But, the lure of making one's camera look like an awesome movie rig draws us all in, my friend. Gear lust is a disease that constantly eats away at your savings account.

Seriously though, I've been shooting with a 7D for a while and if you can afford only one accessory, I find a loupe/viewfinder to be almost essential. When in movie mode, you can't use the camera viewfinder so you're stuck with the LCD. It gets really tough if you are focusing by eye, and/or trying to work outside in the sun.

If you want to buy a bunch of support gear, though, this site has a lot of really affordable gear specialized for DSLR cameras - http://jag35.com/new.../dslr-products/
  • 0

#7 Mathew Rudenberg

Mathew Rudenberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 May 2010 - 12:12 PM

There is a wireless follow focus in development that talks directly to the autofocus motor in the Canon lenses (no external gearing and/or motor required). They're apparently having some development issues but I think they'll overcome them. If they do successfully bring it to market it will radically change what a tricked-out Canon HDSLR looks like.


That's pretty interesting!

Do you know who's working on it?
  • 0

#8 Jean Dodge

Jean Dodge
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 110 posts
  • Director

Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:07 PM

Less is more. To view the LCD screen well, buy a pair of reading glasses and keep your eyes close to the screen. To get good images, use decent prime lenses and proper camera support. For accessories, I'd suggest a heavy fluid head and sturdy legs, some neutral density filters and two extra batteries. The rest is completely optional and will only marginally affect your ability to make great images. What matters is your skill, experience and knowledge base, and your imagination.

There are now 20,000 more film makers out there than there were two years ago. That doesn't bother me. What bothers me are the "ASPIRING" ones.
  • 0

#9 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 05 May 2010 - 05:37 PM

I've decided to get myself a Canon 7d for use shooting HD video. I'm wondering what attachments I will need to get my hands on to maximize it's value as a video camera as opposed to a stills camera.

Specifically, what do I get to make it look like this?

And do i need to make it look like this?


If you are shooting just HD video, there is a model that shoots video just the same but is much cheaper. I think it's called the xi or something like that. I'm in the UK and we have different names for stuff over here.

love

Freya
  • 0

#10 Rob Vogt

Rob Vogt
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 05 May 2010 - 06:09 PM

I think youre thinking of the T2i aka the 550D
  • 0

#11 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 05 May 2010 - 07:19 PM

That's pretty interesting!
Do you know who's working on it?


I do but I learned it from someone at NAB who asked that the company's name be left out of any discussion (I guess I'm under a voluntary NDA :blink: ). They've got working prototypes but have run into a snag that's probably going to be fixed. I think I know some of what they're dealing with since I've spent some time playing around with the Canon EOS Remote software and its wired version of remote focus. One issue is I found is backlash where when you try to return to a previous focus the lens doesn't quite match the earlier focus point. That's not unusual for still lenses and one of the many reasons why motion picture lenses are one heck of a lot more expensive than still lenses even when the basic optical quality is similar.
  • 0

#12 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 06 May 2010 - 07:27 AM

I think youre thinking of the T2i aka the 550D


Thats the thing! T2i, exactly the same video features but much cheaper! Seems like a great deal!

love

Freya
  • 0

#13 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

Jason Hinkle (RIP)
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 240 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Chicago, IL

Posted 06 May 2010 - 04:47 PM

I do but I learned it from someone at NAB who asked that the company's name be left out of any discussion (I guess I'm under a voluntary NDA :blink: ). They've got working prototypes but have run into a snag that's probably going to be fixed...


i'd love to hear more about that too. i've played around a bit with using the canon software to pull focus on my laptop connected to the camera via USB. it works but the canon software is pretty clunky. A wireless focus control would be killer.
  • 0

#14 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 23 September 2010 - 12:49 PM

Remote focus will always be less than precise. The lens is driven using spur gears which have backlash (slop in he teeth engagement) which will only get worse with use. For positive, repeatable positioning, you would need a system driven by an encoder and reader as used for positioning on CNC equipment. Doable, but not likely on a $2000 plastic camera.
  • 0

#15 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 25 September 2010 - 07:54 PM

Remote focus will always be less than precise. The lens is driven using spur gears which have backlash (slop in he teeth engagement) which will only get worse with use. For positive, repeatable positioning, you would need a system driven by an encoder and reader as used for positioning on CNC equipment. Doable, but not likely on a $2000 plastic camera.


It would be possible to write software that included the backlash parameters. It would have to be calibrated with each individual lens it was being used with. There are some pretty smart people working on developing toys and widgets for these cameras so not all hope is lost...yet.
  • 0

#16 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 25 September 2010 - 10:07 PM

It would be possible to write software that included the backlash parameters. It would have to be calibrated with each individual lens it was being used with. There are some pretty smart people working on developing toys and widgets for these cameras so not all hope is lost...yet.


Still a $2000 plastic camera using (most often) still camera lenses. You still need some type of encoder and reader for absolute positioning. It would be easier and cheaper to switch from a spur gears setup to a worm drive follow focus which would at least have the ability to have the backlash mechanically adjusted out. All these shortcomings are great for the niche workshops that are churning out accessory equipment to make these camera more usable. In the end, it's still trying to make a silk purse out of a sow ear.
  • 0

#17 Christopher Santucci

Christopher Santucci
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Buffalo, New York

Posted 26 December 2010 - 02:39 PM

How would you handhold that rig?
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Visual Products

Opal

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Technodolly

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies