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White balance / grading


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#1 Christopher Norin

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 01:04 AM

I'm trying to figure out how to achieve the look I want for a short piece I'm shooting (exteriors). It needs to have a colder feel to it.

The options are, as I see it, to balance for daylight and grade it in post or balance for tungsten and get the blue in camera.

What are the benefits of white balancing for the color temperature you're actually shooting in, even if you know it'll be corrected later. Does it limit my options in post when grading "in-camera"?

Best,
Christopher
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 10:46 AM

I'm trying to figure out how to achieve the look I want for a short piece I'm shooting (exteriors). It needs to have a colder feel to it.

The options are, as I see it, to balance for daylight and grade it in post or balance for tungsten and get the blue in camera.

What are the benefits of white balancing for the color temperature you're actually shooting in, even if you know it'll be corrected later. Does it limit my options in post when grading "in-camera"?

Best,
Christopher


Just depends. You are throwing away information when you bias the color of the image one way or the other, but if you won't need that information in post, it doesn't really matter. My general feeling is that you should go halfway in camera and finish the effect in post. I wouldn't go full tungsten in daylight because you have so little red information to work with in post (such as fleshtones.) Unless you are shooting with the Red, in which case it doesn't matter, tungsten balance is just metadata, the recording is always around 5000K.

But if shooting with a Sony camcorder, for example, I generally use the halfway filter wheel "C", which is sort of like an 81EF correction for daylight on tungsten film stock, sort of a pale cold balance (I don't know the Kelvin, maybe it's around 4500K?)

If you don't have a filter wheel, but can select a color temp, pick something in the 4000's. If not, then white balance off of a warm-toned card for a pale blue bias.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 01:23 PM

Certainly agree with David. I like to get some "idea" in camera, which can be embellished or taken back later on. Normally for cool feelings I go with 4600K. If I want something warmer, I might go 7000K. On film, i'll normally use an 81EF when I'm unsure if I want a cool or warm scene.
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#4 Christopher Norin

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 04:14 PM

I appreciate both your comments. Thanks!
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#5 Lorenzo Levrini

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 09:22 AM

You are assuming that you will get your 'cold' feel solely by affecting the white balance, which is not always the case. Think of your palette, etc.
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#6 Christopher Norin

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:55 PM

You are assuming that you will get your 'cold' feel solely by affecting the white balance, which is not always the case. Think of your palette, etc.


That's true. I just wasn't sure about the pros and cons with balancing correctly if you want a specific look.
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Glidecam

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Visual Products

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post