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Kino Diffusion


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#1 anthony derose

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 06:03 PM

Do most people diff their kinos? I have a few times put some 250 up but have found that it can kill my output at times. I usually just like having it not super close and with the egg crate on. Its all taste but it seems 50/50 on the sets I have been. Some people like them softer others sometimes toss the egg crate and use them like that. When is it good to add the diffusion to them? I assume in small locations when even though the light is soft it looks to hot because of the distance.
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#2 Gus Sacks

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 09:37 AM

I guess it depends on the situation, but something like Light Grid is nice, or Tough Opal. Something that doesn't cut too much transmission.
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#3 Rob Vogt

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 02:28 PM

Yeah the falloff from kinos is pretty drastic but I was on set where the 4x4 fixture was about 1 foot from the actor and we put a 4x4 silk up, but that's more that cuts more than I normally would.
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#4 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 03:24 PM

I guess it depends on the situation, but something like Light Grid is nice, or Tough Opal. Something that doesn't cut too much transmission.


It really comes down to how you like your kinos to feel. Like you say it's personal taste.

For my taste without diffusion they feel very much like a fluorescent source even though they're naturally soft, and thus I seldom use them without diffusion unless I'm in a fluorescent environment.

Their quality with light grid is very pleasing to me, but naturally you lose the punch and the directionality of the egg crate.

It's the constant trade-off between softness and throw/control that we have to face with all of our lighting equipment, be it kino, tungsten, HMI or LED - you have to choose what's right in a particular situation, there's no absolute answer.
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#5 Michael K Bergstrom

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 11:52 PM

If my kino's are close to the subject, I like to throw Hampshire Frost on. Gives me some spread without taking off too much of the punch. As soon as you clip something on though, you take away the throw, that's no lie.
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#6 Cory Dross

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 11:41 PM

I find most times I'm using opal or light grid. Kino's have an interesting harsh/soft kick to them, which I find can be a little unnatural. But, for adding to fluorescent sources or adding more daylight, I think sometimes it looks more natural without the diffusion.
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