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Zeiss CP.2 lenses vs ZE still lenses


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#1 Lisa Stacilauskas

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 01:09 PM

Since the CP.2 lenses and the ZE still lenses supposedly use the same glass, does that mean you can mix and match these lenses? Has anyone tested them for differences or similarities in color and contrast?
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#2 Drew Maw

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 10:30 AM

I would say that's very accurate. The only problem with the CP.2 lenses is that T2.1 is (imho) too slow. The benefits of using CP.2 lenses, doesn't outweigh the costs (vs ZE). Unless you're renting cine-tape, but look at Redrock's remote follow focus system, it sure seems like with this unit, you can calibrate any lens to be used to pull focus in a professional environment. Their microtape is a game changer
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#3 Ben Brahem Ziryab

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 11:42 AM

They are much of the same lenses. The biggest difference between Zeiss ZE and GP.2, I would say is the housing, and price of course. Zeiss CP.2 are intended for cinematography purposes, unlike the ZE glass that is for still cameras. So, of course, they cost a lot more.

Anyway, to get to your question. The main difference between them is that the glass on GP.2 is color matched and hand picked by Zeiss. The iris control on the CP.2 is also manual, so you can do iris pulls. Iris and focus barrel are ready for a follow focus. Different front housing. You will also have a common aperture of T2.1 from 28mm to 100mm. And I read somewhere that the GP.2 have a small baffle over the rear element to control lens flare.

These are the differences, so they don't really differ that much optically but mainly on the housing. And yes, you can mix them at same stop.

Edited by Ziryab Ben Brahem, 14 October 2010 - 11:44 AM.

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#4 Nolan M Berbano

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:34 AM

Hey Lisa! Its Nolan. I didn't know you were on these forums. Does this mean you're picking up some CP2 glass?
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#5 Sing Howe Yam

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:33 AM

Number of aperture blades are different on the ZE and CP.2

The ZE series have 9 blades and the CP.2 is 14 blades. I will say this, the CP.2 have great ft markings.
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#6 Lisa Stacilauskas

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 05:56 PM

Hi Nolan and Drew!

 

I was just doing a search on the internet and it brought me to my own old (3 yr old) post, which I had forgotten about and now see that Nolan and Drew both replied. 

 

In case anyone else finds themselves reading this old post...

 

I bought a set of ZE lenses back in 2010 for a feature. I'm very happy with the glass.


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