Jump to content


Photo

Films that have had a profound influence on your own work.


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:35 PM

This should be interesting.

List the films and the cinematographers who shot them, that have had a profound influence on your own personal style. They do not need to be in any particular order. Post away.

Here are mine:

The Third Man (1949), Cinematography by Robert Krasker

Posted Image

Apocalypse Now (1979), Cinematography by Vittorio Storaro

Posted Image

There Will Be Blood (2007), Cinematography by Robert Elswit

Posted Image

Edited by Andrew Rieger, 20 May 2010 - 12:36 PM.

  • 0

#2 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:37 PM

Pulp Fiction (1994), Cinematography by Andrzej Sekuła

Posted Image

Out of the Past (1947), Cinematography by Nicholas Musuraca

Posted Image

The Fall (2008), Cinematography by Colin Watkinson

Posted Image

Children of Men (2006), Cinematography by Emmanuel Lubezki

Posted Image

Stalker (1979), Cinematography by Alexander Knyazhinsky

Posted Image
  • 0

#3 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:39 PM

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007), Cinematography by Roger Deakins

Posted Image

2001 A Space Odyssey (1968), Cinematography by Geoffrey Unsworth

Posted Image

Werckmeister Harmonies (2000), Cinematography by Patrick de Ranter

Posted Image

Soy Cuba (1964), Cinematography by Sergey Urusevsky

Posted Image

The Thin Red Line (1998), Cinematography by John Toll

Posted Image
  • 0

#4 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:41 PM

City of God (2002), Cinematography by C├ęsar Charlone

Posted Image

Come and See (1985), Cinematography by Alexei Rodionov

Posted Image

Blade Runner (1982), Cinematography by Jordan Cronenweth

Posted Image
  • 0

#5 Pilvari Pirtola

Pilvari Pirtola

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Director
  • Helsinki

Posted 20 May 2010 - 05:39 PM

Begotten (1990) by Elias E. Merhige
Posted Image
  • 0

#6 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 May 2010 - 07:44 PM

I grew up in the 1970's and graduated high school in 1980, so I'm a product of that time, particularly the post "Star Wars" era. I'm also half-Japanese and have had a natural interest in that culture.

So my early years were filled with watching "Star Trek" re-runs and Japanese monster movies, particularly the original "Godzilla".

That led me into reading science fiction books and watching "Space: 1999" when it aired, and seeing "2001" when it first aired on national television in 1975-ish.

Next I saw "Star Wars" and "Close Encounters", but it really was the second that got me excited about filmmaking. It was the first movie where I noticed how it was directed, edited, and lit. That was followed by "Superman: The Movie", the first film where I noticed the cinematographer's name, since the movie was dedicated to him. That made me curious about what a cinematographer did. I discovered an issue of "American Cinematographer" devoted to "Superman" and Geoffrey Unsworth's career, probably picked it up at a science fiction convention where I was trying to sell some of my art.

Around the time of high school graduation, Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" came out, starting my interest in Kurosawa movies. I went off the college and fell in love with "Seven Samurai". The early 1980's was also to time of Storaro and his work in "Apocalypse Now" and "Reds", a major influence on me. I also saw "Days of Heaven" the first time in a 16mm print that a professor showed our film class.

In fact, I'd have to say that it was the combination of the British cinematography of Unsworth, Watkin, Alcott, Young, and Morris (I was a huge fan of British cinema, particularly their sci-fi / fanstasy movies) combined with my love of Storaro's work, plus the cinematography of those Spielberg movies I loved (the work of Zsigmond, Daviau, Fraker, Slocombe) that had the biggest influence on my style.

In terms of movies in general, the 1980's was also when I became obsessed over the older films of Kurosawa, Lean, Hitchcock, Welles, Kubrick. But I have to say that big widescreen sci-fi epics were my biggest interest. At some point, I even considered going into visual effects.
  • 0

#7 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 08:24 PM

I grew up in the 1970's and graduated high school in 1980, so I'm a product of that time, particularly the post "Star Wars" era. I'm also half-Japanese and have had a natural interest in that culture.

So my early years were filled with watching "Star Trek" re-runs and Japanese monster movies, particularly the original "Godzilla".

That led me into reading science fiction books and watching "Space: 1999" when it aired, and seeing "2001" when it first aired on national television in 1975-ish.

Next I saw "Star Wars" and "Close Encounters", but it really was the second that got me excited about filmmaking. It was the first movie where I noticed how it was directed, edited, and lit. That was followed by "Superman: The Movie", the first film where I noticed the cinematographer's name, since the movie was dedicated to him. That made me curious about what a cinematographer did. I discovered an issue of "American Cinematographer" devoted to "Superman" and Geoffrey Unsworth's career, probably picked it up at a science fiction convention where I was trying to sell some of my art.

Around the time of high school graduation, Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" came out, starting my interest in Kurosawa movies. I went off the college and fell in love with "Seven Samurai". The early 1980's was also to time of Storaro and his work in "Apocalypse Now" and "Reds", a major influence on me. I also saw "Days of Heaven" the first time in a 16mm print that a professor showed our film class.

In fact, I'd have to say that it was the combination of the British cinematography of Unsworth, Watkin, Alcott, Young, and Morris (I was a huge fan of British cinema, particularly their sci-fi / fanstasy movies) combined with my love of Storaro's work, plus the cinematography of those Spielberg movies I loved (the work of Zsigmond, Daviau, Fraker, Slocombe) that had the biggest influence on my style.

In terms of movies in general, the 1980's was also when I became obsessed over the older films of Kurosawa, Lean, Hitchcock, Welles, Kubrick. But I have to say that big widescreen sci-fi epics were my biggest interest. At some point, I even considered going into visual effects.


My college roommate is obsessed with Kurosawa and he has the giant box set with practically all his films. We have made it through about 8 or so of them and Ran is certainly a masterpiece, as is Rashomon, Seven Samurai, and Yojimbo. I love the sci-fi epics as well. My roommate and I would love to make a sci-fi throwback film that emulates the look of the original Star Wars Trilogy and Star Trek films using old-school special effects and miniatures. Not sure if it something that studios or the public would be interested in but fans of that era would enjoy it and guys like Tarantino seem to do well financially with throwback films so you never know. It would certainly be a nice change of pace from all the gci.

Edited by Andrew Rieger, 20 May 2010 - 08:25 PM.

  • 0

#8 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 20 May 2010 - 08:36 PM

Here are some others that have influenced me:

The Man Who Wasn't There (2001), Cinematography by Roger Deakins

Posted Image

Ran (1985), Cinematography by Asakazu Nakai, Takao Saito, and Masaharu Ueda

Posted Image

Schindler's List (1993), Cinematography by Janusz Kamiński

Posted Image

Kingdom of Heaven (2005), Cinematography by John Mathieson

Posted Image

Limits of Control (2009), Cinematography by Christopher Doyle

Posted Image
  • 0

#9 Mei Lewis

Mei Lewis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 21 May 2010 - 03:05 AM

Schindler's List (1993), Cinematography by Janusz Kamiński
Posted Image


I've never seen Schindler's List, but does it really use selective color?!?!?!?!?
  • 0

#10 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 21 May 2010 - 07:04 AM

I believe only for 1 or two scenes. I know there is the opening and the bit with the girl in red; but that's all I can think of.
  • 0

#11 Mei Lewis

Mei Lewis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 21 May 2010 - 07:16 AM

Wow, that really surprises me. The cheapest, tackiest gimmick that cynical wedding photographers use and that film got so much approbation.
  • 0

#12 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 21 May 2010 - 10:34 AM

Wow, that really surprises me. The cheapest, tackiest gimmick that cynical wedding photographers use and that film got so much approbation.


It serves a story point. You should see the movie before you make such a comment.
  • 0

#13 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 21 May 2010 - 02:36 PM

Wow, that really surprises me. The cheapest, tackiest gimmick that cynical wedding photographers use and that film got so much approbation.


The use of selective color in the film was quite effective. David is right, see a film before you criticize. Ever see Sin City, the whole film is B/W with selective color, hardly a cheap gimmick. And why so much hate for wedding photographers, they are some of the hardest working photographers around and the job is super super stressful. Plus, they get no respect from "serious" photographers. Sure its not the most exciting job in photography but many are very creative individuals who need to pay the bills and could shoot circles around some so-called artistic photographers.
  • 0

#14 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 May 2010 - 02:42 PM

Being made in 1993, I suspect it was also done well before any wedding use of the technique. Except, perhaps, by rather expensive, stylish wedding photographers of that period.
  • 0

#15 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 21 May 2010 - 03:03 PM

Tinting objects with color in a b&w movie goes back to the Silent Era.

Another example would be Kurosawa's "High & Low", a 1960's era widescreen b&w movie. At one point, the suitcase containing the ransom money has been treated by the police so that if the kidnapper attempts to burn it, it would send up a cloud of pink smoke. Later, you see a POV from the hilltop mansion of the city below, and a cloud of pink smoke rising in the b&w landscape.

Hitchcock added a red tint to a flash of gunfire near the end of his b&w "Spellbound."
  • 0

#16 Mei Lewis

Mei Lewis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 21 May 2010 - 03:23 PM

I didn't mean that its use in the film was tacky, just that its use elsewhere almost always is (all the uses I've seen anyway). I haven't seen the film so I don't know how it works there, I was just surprised it was used at all. I suppose I should see the film because of this, though I have no other interest in it.

Sin City is a very different movie and I'm not surprised by the technique being used there. The computer game Mad World has a very similar look that works well for it.


And I'm certainly not hating wedding photographers! I photograph weddings myself! Some of the best photographers shoot weddings. It attracts talent because the financial rewards are there and it can also be very enjoyable and fulfilling.

I know some people rag on wedding photographers but I'm not one of them.
Still, like any other kind of job there are people who go with trends and do whatever they can to make as much money from people as they can. I'd describe them as cynical wedding photographers.
  • 0

#17 Mei Lewis

Mei Lewis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 21 May 2010 - 03:25 PM

Being made in 1993, I suspect it was also done well before any wedding use of the technique. Except, perhaps, by rather expensive, stylish wedding photographers of that period.


Being expensive doesn't make them stylish, and being stylish doesn't mean I'd like their photos.
  • 0

#18 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 May 2010 - 04:03 PM

Being expensive doesn't make them stylish, and being stylish doesn't mean I'd like their photos.


In pre Photoshop days it would've been expensive, liking or disliking a style is personal and is a judgement at a particular moment in time and overuse can devalue an visual image. As an effect it would've been unusual in a wedding photograph of that period, perhaps something found more in advertising.

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 21 May 2010 - 04:04 PM.

  • 0

#19 Andrew Rieger

Andrew Rieger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Student
  • Orange County, California and San Antonio, Texas

Posted 21 May 2010 - 05:12 PM

Here are a few more:

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), Cinematography by Robert Yeoman

Posted Image

2046 (2004), Cinematography by Christopher Doyle

Posted Image

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), Cinematography by Tonino Delli Colli

Posted Image

Touch of Evil (1958), Cinematography by Russell Metty

Posted Image
  • 0

#20 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11937 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 May 2010 - 07:16 PM

I try not to suffer inspiration, it only serves as a vector for disappointment!
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Opal

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

The Slider

Technodolly

Glidecam

Opal

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineLab