Jump to content


William A Fraker ASC


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Tim Partridge

Tim Partridge
  • Guests

Posted 03 June 2010 - 06:09 AM

I have just read that the great cinematographer died on Tuesday.

Six time Oscar nominee (nominated for both cinematography AND visual effects on Spielberg's 1941).
  • 0

#2 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2274 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 03 June 2010 - 06:33 AM

Thats sad to hear .
  • 0

#3 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 410 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 03 June 2010 - 08:34 AM

He had a tremendous body of work from the late 60's to the early 80's. I will always admire what he did on "Bullitt", "Rosemary's Baby", "The Exorcist II", "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" or "1941", which may well be his masterpiece. And he seemed like a real nice man.

Rest in peace, Mr. Fraker.
  • 0

#4 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 03 June 2010 - 12:50 PM

He was a good man with a kind heart. On the set he was tough but fair. He never failed to acknowledge your work after a hard day. He had more energy that those half his age. He was a great mentor and I, for one, will miss him.
  • 0

#5 Gregory Irwin

Gregory Irwin
  • Sustaining Members
  • 606 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Work is based in Los Angeles but I live elsewhere.

Posted 20 June 2010 - 10:08 AM

He was a good man with a kind heart. On the set he was tough but fair. He never failed to acknowledge your work after a hard day. He had more energy that those half his age. He was a great mentor and I, for one, will miss him.


I couldn't agree more with Tom. Tom, you have stated this perfectly. I just returned from Europe to learn of this very sad news. I had the pleasure of being his First AC during the 1980's and 1990's. He was more than a boss to me. He was my mentor and a sort of a "movie dad". He taught me the discipline and the respect needed to be a top member of the camera department. Was he tough? You bet he was. But he had an effectiveness that wanted you to be more and better - for him. He understood how difficult the job could be and he never failed to show his appreciation for one's efforts. He was always very clear on what he expected of everyone around him, whether you were working directly for him or otherwise. But he was always the gentleman. He taught me the importance of being a gentleman and always exhibiting politeness while on set towards your fellow co-workers. No other way would do with Billy. He was my role model on how to act and portray my professionalism as a cameraman. I too, will miss him profoundly.

Cheers Billy! You will always be a part of me.

Gregory Irwin

Edited by Gregory Irwin, 20 June 2010 - 10:10 AM.

  • 0

#6 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20074 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 June 2010 - 12:49 PM

I was just looking at the opening of "1941" again for some ideas on a project:


Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image
  • 0

#7 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 410 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 10 July 2010 - 07:49 PM

I rewatched the very disturbing "Looking for Mr. Goodbar", which was directed by Richard Brooks in 1977. This was Fraker's first Academy Award nomination and one of his best efforts. It's interesting because while being fond of the classical style of the classic "studio look", on "Goodbar" Fraker adopted a very low key look for most scenes and mixed hard and soft sources. But instead of going extremely realistic, he managed to keep a low-con & romantic look, with lots of halation from highlights due to the use of his regular filter pack (most likely a Fog #1 combined with a Mitchell A diffuser) to make the look a bit more friendly to the viewer, since the felt the film itself already was too depressing. The very last scene, with a strobe light that leaves random frames unexposed, is amazing and unforgettable.
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

CineTape

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Visual Products

Abel Cine

The Slider

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies