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I need help for my term paper (Urgent)


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#1 Fulya Ozkan

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 03:48 AM

Hello everyone, I am new in this site... I have a term paper about "NEW CINEMATOGRAPHY TECHNOLOGIES IN DOCUMENTARY FILMS"... I have not much information about it, because this is my selective course. I really need help.

- Does anyone have sources (articles or something like that) about my topic?

- Which subtitles should be added to my term paper? (I wanna start with "what is cinematography?" after the introduction part)

- Can you give me an information about SD, HD, 35mm, 16mm and 8mm cameras?

- Do you know any documentary films which was shot with HD technology?

I am open to all assistances. I haven't got a lot of time for it.

THANK YOU SO MUCH

Sonatina
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 04:11 AM

I think you should probably click here, then re-read this:

Forum Terms and Rules PLEASE READ THIS - IT'S NOT LONG.
You must register using your REAL NAME as your account's Display Name
.That means your first name, a space, then your last name. If you don'tuse your real name, or you register with a name that looks like yourreal name but we find out is not your real name, your account will be permanently disabled.


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#3 Fulya Ozkan

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 04:39 AM

Oh ok, excuse me. I never seen it. Immediately change my name...
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#4 Rob Vogt

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 07:48 AM

:rolleyes:


Alright. The most recent big change I'd notice is the HDSLR cameras will make it look less like a film shoot, and more covert. Obviously people have been hiding cameras for a while now, but now you can keep them out and still not know its a film being made.
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#5 Will Earl

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 10:29 AM

The two most important questions I would assume for this topic would be "What new cinematography technologies are being used in documentaries?" and "Why are they being used?".

At a guess, if you look at any recent documentary within the last five years, the majority would have been shot using a digital camera (DV or HD). A few reasons why someone might use digital over film for a documentary would be...

Size of camera - DV, HDSLR and certain HD cameras can be quite portable and unobtrusive. In situations where one doesn't want to draw attention to the documentary crew and to keep the crew to a minimum.
Longer recording time - 60 minute tape is more attractive over a 400ft (10min) reel of 16mm film if you wish to record hours of footage.
Extended shooting schedule - In many cases you'll find the documentary has been shot by a few people over a very extended time period. I'm guessing the the cost of ownership/rental of camera + recording medium would probably be far less for digital over say a period of a year than say film would be.

I suggest you at some of the films on this list http://www.pastemaga...-2000-2009.html and pick a few which have been shot digitally and look for articles about them - a good place to look would be American Cinematographer, they may have articles about some of the films.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 10:48 AM

The short per-shot recording times of HDSLR, plus the shallow depth of field, don't make them ideal documentary cameras other than for covert shooting in public.

I would start the paper with an intro into past trends, for example, why 16mm/Super-16 was the format of choice for so many decades, then the intro of video formats -- the professional cameras like Sony Betacam in the 1980's and consumer and prosumer cameras of the 1990's, then the introduction of digital HDTV cameras in the late 1990's, and then consumer HD by the mid 2000's.

I would list the significant documentaries pre-2000 and post-2000 and find out what format they were shot on, and why if any articles exist in various magazines and books.

I would also define what you mean by a documentary and separate them into categories (nature, interview, archival, etc.) and how that can affect the cinematography (a talking head has different visual needs than a landscape.)

An example of a documentaries shot on professional HD cameras would be Michael Moore's starting with "Bowling for Columbine" (2002).

On the other hand, Ken Burns still shoots 16mm/Super-16 for his documentaries.

Most of the lower-budgeted ones have used some sort of prosumer/consumer gear. Many documentaries also mix formats and cameras.
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#7 Fulya Ozkan

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 12:12 PM

Thanks all... I really like your advices. Now, I am looking for articles about them.

Have a great day!
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#8 Fulya Ozkan

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 12:36 PM

Can we say that there is two different cinematography? (digital cinematography and analog cinematography)

I think SD and HD camera formats are digital and 35mm,16mm and 8mm are analog. Is it true? Are there any other formats? Can you tell me please an internet source in order to describe and introduce these formats? I know, I am asking a lot and so sorry about that. But I really don't know anything about it. I am a cultural studies student which is mostly related to political science.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 03:18 PM

It's a bit confusing to call film origination "analog" in the sense the video cameras were also analog until the 1990's -- beta-SP, for example, is an analog videotape format still probably being used somewhere in the world.

For example, when I was in film school from 1988-1991, the school got some analog Hi-8 consumer camcorders but by my final year, they were getting into Digital-8 (DV recorded to Hi-8 tape). See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi-8

But throughout the 1990's, though Digital Betacam existed, most U.S. pro video production were still using analog beta-SP simply due to the huge numbers of Sony BVW600 cameras that were sold.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betacam

Nowadays, almost all video shooting is done with digital recorders so one could talk about film vs. digital just as well as film vs. video, video and digital are somewhat interchangeable, though the makers of modern digital cinema cameras don't like the "video" moniker applied to them, feeling that it belongs to cameras meant for broadcast work.

It may be interesting to discuss the look in interlaced-scan video and how that has become associated with news and "reality" because of the switchover from film to interlaced-scan video cameras for news in the mid 1970's, though in the past, newsreels were shot on film, as well as nightly news reportage in the field. But now we have so many progressive-scan video cameras that can emulate a film look better that it has become a big question was to whether to shoot reality shows, nature shows, etc. in progressive scan or not if the end goal is TV broadcast. Some people find it odd when a cooking show, for example, has a film look because it was shot in progressive scan.
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#10 Fulya Ozkan

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 11:30 AM

Thanks again, your information is so helpful for me...

What are the advantages and disadvantages of digital technologies especially for documentary film?
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