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Sony EX3 or No Sony EX3 ??


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#1 Bwana George

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 09:19 AM

While waiting for the Scarlet's release, we wanted to use the Sony EX3 in the meantime.

I just got our brand new Sony EX3 yesterday, and some of the accessories. This AM I've been setting it up.

It's a beautiful little camera, but I have to say I'm rather disappointed. With the camera and all the accessories I want with it, it has cost us a "lot" of money. I am SERIOUSLY thinking of returning it all.

I can't believe how much of this camera is "plastic". It's ALL plastic. Jeeeeeeeeez, what happened to aluminum? It does fit right in with the modern age when everything is going to plastic, but it doesn't fit in with what I would call "durability" and "long lastability". We put our equipment through a lot of stresses and environmental abuse, and I just don't see how this Sony can hold up to it. I have a feeling that if we ever dropped it, it would shatter into a million pieces. And, then the repairs would be financially out of control.

I've shot with pro film and still equipment all my life, and everything I've used has been made of metal and known for it's durability, such as Arri's and Nikons, even including our modern Nikon D2X DSLR which has a metal body.

I'll sleep on it for a few days and check the camera out further, but I am not hopeful. I think it might just be better to wait for the Scarlet, no matter how long it takes. The entire Scarlet package will cost more, that's true, but why waste money ahead of time. I'll also bet that this Sony EX3 does NOT hold it's resale value worth a damn.

Oh well, life goes on.
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 09:42 AM

It's a prosumer camera.

I'm willing to bet you probably didn't buy an Arri film camera, probably because you couldn't possibly afford to. You can afford the EX3, because it's made of plastic.

P
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#3 James Martin

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:04 AM

You will also find that the F900 is made from a considerable amount of plastic.

Also, the RED ONE (and likely scarlet) are unlikely to handle being dropped any more than anything else.

The last time I checked, lenses were still as vulnerable on any camera.

If the EX3 fits your needs and does what you want it to, keep it. If your sole reason for returning it is the body being plastic.... did you not use one before you bought it? If that is the case, it's your fault and your fault alone. Sorry!
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 11:18 AM

Yes, I'm not sure how someone dropped that much cash for a camera sight unseen, without actually holding one in his hands first. Just based on specs and photos of the product?

The EX3 is an excellent camera, probably the best deal for its price right now. I can't think of anything the comes close on the market.

If it doesn't make back its cost of ownership within two years from the work it generates, then it probably wasn't a good idea to invest in it. But that's true for any electronic camera. And once it's paid for itself, I'm not sure the resale value means much, that's just gravy at that point.

The Scarlet doesn't exist yet so it's not a serious option. And if you could have waited to buy a better camera later, you should have. And if you needed a camera right now, then there's no point in wondering if some future camera would have been better, right?

So I'm sure the point of this whole thread, comparing the best camera choice right now to what could be a better camera choice next year, when you have to buy a camera right now.

Send it back and wait a year, if you don't really need a camera right now after all. But I assume you spent that much money because the camera was going to pay for itself with the work you had lined up for it.
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#5 Bwana George

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 11:30 AM

It's a prosumer camera.

I'm willing to bet you probably didn't buy an Arri film camera, probably because you couldn't possibly afford to. You can afford the EX3, because it's made of plastic.

P


Sorry, but you'd lose that bet. I've "owened" an Arri, a Bolex, and others, for many years, and they were ALL made of metal and extremely durable.
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 11:55 AM

Well, yeah, OK, what sort of Arri? A 16BL?

Mr Mullen has the drop on this I think.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:11 PM

Sorry, but you'd lose that bet. I've "owened" an Arri, a Bolex, and others, for many years, and they were ALL made of metal and extremely durable.


All I can say is that the EX cameras have survived the rental house market, which is pretty tough on gear.

Besides, what prosumer cameras for under $10,000 have a body made of metal currently? Not that I know, I'm just asking.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:18 PM

The Scarlet probably will be an EX "killer" when it finally arrives, though in truth there are still a lot of reasons a broadcast shooter may want to stick to an EX3, besides having basic things like XLR mic inputs and shooting in a codec that can be immediately ingested into editing. But certainly for narrative work, most people are going to prefer to use the Scarlet. But it isn't available yet.

The whole "uproar" over the use of plastic for an under $10,000 camera is a bit odd. I bought the "cheaper" version of the Canon 7D -- the 550D -- and the body is made of plastic.
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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:39 PM

The whole "uproar" over the use of plastic for an under $10,000 camera is a bit odd. I bought the "cheaper" version of the Canon 7D -- the 550D -- and the body is made of plastic.


Plastics have replaced aluminium on aerospace applications.

http://www.composite...dge-on-the-a380

The correct plastics combined with metals can produce a product that is both strong and lightweight.
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#10 Bwana George

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:52 PM

All I can say is that the EX cameras have survived the rental house market, which is pretty tough on gear.

Besides, what prosumer cameras for under $10,000 have a body made of metal currently? Not that I know, I'm just asking.



Very good point. If they can withstand the rental markets, they can probably withstand anything.

I am now considering the Canon 5D MarkII for video, especially since it has a full-sized sensor.

You're also, right, about me laying out that kind of cash without holding it first. We all make mistakes, and live and learn, and I'm the KING of that.
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#11 Andreas Wood

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 01:35 PM

Plastics have replaced aluminium on aerospace applications.

http://www.composite...dge-on-the-a380

The correct plastics combined with metals can produce a product that is both strong and lightweight.


Interesting article, Brian. I was about to post that I think the EX-3 must have some sort of composite plastic when I saw your post... it might be something like the fiberglass reinforced plastic mentioned.

I say this because I have owned an EX-3 for almost two years now and, although I'm not abusive on gear, it has seen a fair amount of travel and use (and incidentally, Bwana, although I was also initially a little concerned about the bodies durability... it has performed flawlessly and consistently).

Anyway, there are some areas on the camera body where the top layer of plastic has been scratched or worn away revealing a silvery under-layer of what I at first thought was aluminum but certainly could be fiberglass.
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#12 David Williams

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 08:09 PM

My EX3 is nearly two years old, used daily, and has barely a scratch on it. Some parts and panels are plastic, but much more is actually very light alloys which may seem to feel a bit plastic like but are actually quite rugged. Not as tough as broadcast, but far lighter and cheaper. Kind of an obvious trade off there.
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#13 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:33 PM

My EX1 has survived with me in some harsh conditions. Though I'd say any camera you drop will probably shatter into a few pieces...
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#14 Remsy Atassi

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 11:00 PM

I've owned an EX3 for a year now and have had flawless performance from it. Obviously it's a prosumer camcorder and needs to be babied to a certain extent, but it's handled everything(commercial and narrative) I've ever thrown at it, and I really like to get close to the action.

Before I bought the EX3, I called RED about the Scarlet release and there were secretive and unhelpful. Rather than wait, I decided to purchase the EX3 and start building my business, and it was absolutely the right decision. Is it perfect? No. But for under 10K I seriously press you to find something better. And it's paid itself off twice already.

-Remsy Atassi
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