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Anyone heard about heat processing for the Saving Private Ryan stock?


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#1 XiaoSu Han

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 12:28 PM

"I remember Spielberg discussing Saving Private Ryan's processing during the hype about that when it first came out, it had a similar look I think, if higher contrast, he heat stressed col-neg stock by leaving the cans out in full sun in his yard then used a bleach bypass or partial bleach bypass process, very brave if you ask me anything could have gone wrong, I’d committed it to memory but never got round to trying it"

read this on a photography forum...
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 01:51 PM

"I remember Spielberg discussing Saving Private Ryan's processing during the hype about that when it first came out, it had a similar look I think, if higher contrast, he heat stressed col-neg stock by leaving the cans out in full sun in his yard then used a bleach bypass or partial bleach bypass process, very brave if you ask me anything could have gone wrong, I’d committed it to memory but never got round to trying it"

read this on a photography forum...


I've never heard anything about that. It sounds like it could be a rumor related to what happened to Robert Capa's photos from the d-day landing. He shot several rolls and only eleven negatives survived. Here's a snippet of the story written by the photo editor of Life at that time:

"At about 6:30 Wednesday evening, the call came in from a Channel port: Capa's film was on the way. "You should get it in an hour or two," a voice crackled over the line before fading into static. I shared this information with pool editor E. K. Butler of AP, a feisty little martinet whose nickname was "Colonel." He snapped back, "All I want is pictures, not promises!" Around nine, a panting messenger arrived with Capa's little package: four rolls of 35-millimeter film plus half a dozen rolls of 120 film (2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches) that he had taken in England and on the Channel crossing. A scrawled note said that the action was all in the 35-millimeter, that things had been very rough, that he had come back to England unintentionally with wounded being evacuated, and that he was on his way back to Normandy.

Braddy, our lab chief, gave the film to young Dennis Banks to develop. Photographer Hans Wild looked at it wet and called up to me to say that the 35-millimeter, though grainy, looked "fabulous!" I replied, "We need contacts - rush, rush, rush!" Again I phoned Butler through the AP switchboard, but he could only bellow, "When do I get pictures?" Brandt's wirephoto of troops landing apparently unopposed had scarcely satisfied the West's desperate need to believe in the actuality of invasion. A few minutes later Dennis came bounding up the stairs and into my office, sobbing. "They're ruined! Ruined! Capa's films are all ruined!" Incredulous, I rushed down to the darkroom with him, where he explained that he had hung the films, as usual, in the wooden locker that served as a drying cabinet, heated by a coil on the floor. Because of my order to rush, he had closed the doors. Without ventilation the emulsion had melted.

I held up the four rolls, one at a time. Three were hopeless; nothing to see. But on the fourth roll there were eleven frames with distinct images. They were probably representative of the entire 35-millimeter take, but their grainy imperfection — perhaps enhanced by the lab accident — contributed to making them among the most dramatic battlefield photos ever taken. The sequence began as Capa waded through the surf with the infantry, past antitank obstacles that soon became tombstones as men fell left and right. This was it, all right. D-Day would forever be known by these pictures."

Edited by Chris Keth, 01 July 2010 - 01:52 PM.

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#3 Tom Jensen

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 03:21 PM

I also heard a story that a full canvas bag of film sank to the bottom of the ocean when it was dropped while being passed from a smaller boat onto a ship.
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 04:29 PM

I also heard a story that a full canvas bag of film sank to the bottom of the ocean when it was dropped while being passed from a smaller boat onto a ship.


I've heard or read that most if not all of the movie footage of the landing was dpopped into the sea.
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