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#1 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 11:30 AM

Hello,

I am wondering what would be the best set-up to simulate overcast light (stormy day) coming through a window?

I will be setting up this shot at night, so there isn't any natural light streaming in and the talent will be shot, inside, next to a window. I want it to look like she is sitting near a window on a moody overcast day. What type of light, the temperature and the correct gel or diffusion should I use to make this look realistic?

Thank you. -Scott
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 03:42 PM

Shooting a light through a large trace frame, then into your window should do it. Power may be an issue, but I guess you could use a 5k tungsten. However, the frame size and light power would depend on your window size, how far your subject is away, if they move deeper into the room during the shot, film/sensor speed and the stop you want. Another issue is if you actually want to see the window in shot.

You could use a bank of lights if you don't have a single large light. You can cool to taste, perhaps a 1/4 CTB on the light for a cooler look or grade the colour in post. You can use fill in the room according to taste.
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#3 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 12:06 AM

Brian,

First, thanks a bunch for your input.

Just for your reference: The talent will be about 3ft from a large sliding glass patio door, the rest of the room will be dark and the sliding glass door will never be the center of the scene. The talent will stay in a chair for the whole scene so she will not be walking around the room. I will be shooting with vision2 200t or vision3 500t negative in super8.

What materials (regarding the diffusion aspects) you think will be good for a DIY Trace Frame?

Once again, thank you for your time and help.

Best,

Scott
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 02:31 AM

Some 216 should the job and it's common, so you should be able to access it in a 4ft wide sheet (buy an off cut from local film or TV lighting company) without having to buy a full roll.

You might get away with a 2k Blonde.

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 16 June 2010 - 02:34 AM.

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#5 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 11:26 AM

Brian,

Just to recap to make sure I have it clear - I will try this with one 2k light, using a 4x4 cut of 216, and as an option, cool to taste with 1/4 CTB.

I am using Tungsten balanced film so the 2k light streaming in should be color temp 3200k?

Thank you. Scott
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#6 Milo Sekulovich

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 02:36 PM

Why can't you do this in the daytime?
It would be so much easier.
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:41 PM

Brian,

Just to recap to make sure I have it clear - I will try this with one 2k light, using a 4x4 cut of 216, and as an option, cool to taste with 1/4 CTB.

I am using Tungsten balanced film so the 2k light streaming in should be color temp 3200k?

Thank you. Scott


That's correct, I'd go for am open faced light over a Fresnel spot, because they usually punch out a bit more light and the lack of control doesn't matter in this case.
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#8 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:52 PM

Why can't you do this in the daytime?
It would be so much easier.



I need an overcast/gloomy mood for this scene and those are hard to come by here in Los Angeles. Also, as an artistic decision, I want the rest of the room, behind the talent, to be lost in darkness.
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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 02:54 AM

I'd add that having a more powerful light may give you more options distance wise, but you could use more than one light through the trace frame. Also, if you see anything outside through the sliding door, you may have to light that separately.
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#10 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 17 June 2010 - 10:58 AM

I'd add that having a more powerful light may give you more options distance wise, but you could use more than one light through the trace frame. Also, if you see anything outside through the sliding door, you may have to light that separately.



Great point Brian. Now I am wondering at what height and angle I should position it at. I'm thinking high and angling downwards.

I'm still looking for a nice piece of 216 for a good price, but for now I have a cheap shower curtain that seems to be softening the light just right. I may try both set ups. I did a test yesterday and found the 1/4 CTB was working great. It cooled it enough to make it look moody, and left over enough very usable light. This test was inside, so I am still curious to see how it will look from outside. I will try that some time this weekend.

Thanks!
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#11 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 03:24 AM

Shower curtain was the starting point for the soft frosts that are used in diffusion frames to keep down the wind rattle noise on the gel. If it looks OK just use that, just don't get too close with the light.
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#12 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 18 June 2010 - 10:37 AM

Shower curtain was the starting point for the soft frosts that are used in diffusion frames to keep down the wind rattle noise on the gel. If it looks OK just use that, just don't get too close with the light.



Yeah, I'm going to give them a try. I bought two shower curtains ...one is a very thin white and the other is a frosty clear.

These are the lights I am thinking about setting up behind them:

1k

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2k

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#13 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 19 June 2010 - 01:16 PM

Here some tests.

I shot it with my DSLR. I did touch the exposure, but I shot it a little underexposed to capture the feel I am looking for.

My light meter set at 24fps, iso400 gave me a reading of f/s 1.4.

I think the light levels are way too low to shoot on Vison2 200T, so I am thinking about using Vision2 500T. However, I am afraid 500T may be too grainy.

I look forward to hearing any thoughts regarding this set-up and film choice.

Set-up: 2k and a 1k

Posted Image

Test1

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Test 2

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#14 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 19 June 2010 - 01:41 PM

I suspect a single 2k blonde may have more punch that that particular combo.

http://www.arri.de/l...ilite_2000.html

Blonde is a name commonly used for this type of light.
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#15 Scott Di Lalla

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Posted 19 June 2010 - 06:43 PM

I suspect a single 2k blonde may have more punch that that particular combo.

http://www.arri.de/l...ilite_2000.html

Blonde is a name commonly used for this type of light.



Brian,

I can't tell you how much I appreciate your input.

You're right about this set-up - it's not ideal. The 2k is non-directional so I seem to be wasting a lot of light.

I don't have a 2k blonde, but would I get a similar effect if I put two baby 1k Tungstens?

Thank you.
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#16 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 02:58 AM

Given your lighting level requirements no. The open faced lights tend to have a higher light output compared to the equivalent wattage Fresnel units and perhaps those Moles aren't the most efficient anyway. If you've only got Fresnel lights I'd go for a couple of 2Ks or a 5K. Given the light levels in your shot test, I suspect even a single 2K Blonde could be marginal and you'd need to double up, certainly that could the case of you want to use 200T or if you need to stop down.

The soft light effect often needs larger wattage lights compared to the traditional hard light.
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