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New 3D Cinema system from Panavision


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#1 Keith Walters

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 01:39 AM

Or so they say.

New Cinema System from Panavision Makes 3D ‘Simple’ (from DCinemaToday)
Panavision projects its technology (from Variety)

It uses a variant of the Dolby split colour-spectrum system and precision glass lenses rather than the plastic ones Dolby uses.

There is a PDF about it on the Panavision website. although it doesn't tell you much either.

"...the filter technology has been developed by Omega Optical, worldwide supplier of custom filters for a variety of demanding applications. The new Panavision 3D system will be available worldwide, beginning in the Fall of 2010."

There's no information on how the film version actually works but I would imagine they use two super-35 frames stacked into a standard academy space and a special aftermarket lens system to filter and superimpose them on the screen.
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#2 Karel Bata

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 03:52 AM

Aw damn! Just last night I binned a folder of info I had about that I'd picked up at a seminar at Pinewood on Monday. So, from memory they use two super-35 frames stacked into a standard academy space and a special aftermarket lens system to filter and superimpose them on the screen That's exactly right - over/under.

We know it as Technicolor 3D. I believe Panavision bought Technicolor a while back. Or someone owns both. A quick Google: http://bit.ly/Technicolor3D

It involves a lens that is rented to the cinema or per film basis with an annual cap, or can be bought, and turns the over/under into circular polarised 3D - the same projection format as digital 3D, and using the same glasses. The advantage to the cinema is that they don't have to re-invest in digital equipment but will only need to buy a 'silver screen' and hire a set-up technician. If memory serves me right the lens can handle screens up to 40ft, but there are depth limitations for projectors with weak bulbs.

Their literature assumes that cinemas will charge more for 3D and thus make their investment back. But I'm not so sure the public will want to pay more for 3D once they have it at home.

This will have some real impact in regional cinemas, and will also open up a huge market in countries where cinemas can't afford to go digital. But... it means yet another format a film has to be released on. I understand there were 200 versions of Avatar available world-wide! :o
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#3 Keith Walters

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 09:46 PM

Yeah, I remember seeing demonstrations of the same "stacked super-35" approach more the 20 years ago, long before Technicolor cottoned onto the idea.
However those, like the Technicolor approach, use polarizing filters and require a metalized screen. They also gave pretty diabolical results.

The PV system uses the same non-polarizing filter system as Dolby, which, as with Dolby, means an ordinary white screen can be used.
However PV appear to have upped the ante with a system that can be used with existing film projectors with no additional electronics required
This would require some pretty fancy optics, and I don't think too many other companies would have the expertise to make this actually workable.
This approach may now be more practical than in the past with the availability of Digital Intermediate tweaking.

I can't help thinking that this was all part of strategy to extend the life of film projection, something that the former owner of Panavision Ron Perelman invested heavily in when when he bought Deluxe.

"Their literature assumes that cinemas will charge more for 3D and thus make their investment back. But I'm not so sure the public will want to pay more for 3D once they have it at home."

So far my entire "home viewing" experience of 3D has been like looking at a couple of football mtaches played in a fish tank.

The real driving force behind this sort of thing is not so much that you will be able to charge more for the improved whatever, it's more the fear that your competitor might charge THE SAME for the improved version. Since they make most of their money from the overpriced shacks and drinks anyway, getting more people into the cinema is the main goal.

Edited by Keith Walters, 24 June 2010 - 09:49 PM.

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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 05:39 PM

Aw damn! Just last night I binned a folder of info I had about that I'd picked up at a seminar at Pinewood on Monday. So, from memory they use two super-35 frames stacked into a standard academy space and a special aftermarket lens system to filter and superimpose them on the screen That's exactly right - over/under.


Actually it's two slightly smaller than techniscope frames in a standard CinemaScope space.

Lenny Lipton is now involved with an incomatible 3d film projection system:

http://oculus3d.com/

it's a similar sense rotation system, a side by side rotated pair in a CinemaScope frame.
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