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#1 Nathaniel Brunt

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 09:21 PM

Have basically no knowledge of knots besides my trusty shoelace knot and figured I'd better learn a few before getting caught out. What are the 5 or 10 most important knots to know in your opinions?
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 12:36 PM

Have basically no knowledge of knots besides my trusty shoelace knot and figured I'd better learn a few before getting caught out. What are the 5 or 10 most important knots to know in your opinions?


I can't say I've ever had to tie a particular knot on set before. I do think it's a good thing to know a few of the basics no matter who you are or what you do, though. Those might include a square knot, a bowline, 2 half hitches, and a taut-line hitch.
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 02:43 PM

The Bowline and Sheetbend -- pretty much the same thing, only one makes a loop while the other connects two lines. This is the strongest of all knots, breaking at 60% of the ultimate strength of the line in the Plymouth Cordage tests. It's also as close to jam-proof as a knot can be.

The Reef Knot, which is often incorrectly called the Square Knot. (Real Chinese square knotting is different, purely decorative.) The slipped Reef Knot is handy for things you'll need to untie quickly, and the double slipped reef knot is what you use to tie your shoes. (Unless you don't know better and tie a double slipped Granny.... )

The Clove Hitch is commonly used to attach ties to cables. (It's also how you tie a necktie, though I try to avoid having to do that.) For cable ties, I prefer the Ashley Constrictor, mainly because you can cut it off with no danger of nicking the cable. It can be a little dangerous because it gets extremely tight and nearly always jams, so you have to cut it away. So, never tie it around an arm, leg, or finger.

The Adjustable Hitch, AKA Magnus Hitch. If you have to hang a chandelier over a set, this lets you tweak the height quickly and precisely. Also good for securing a load in a truck, though I safety it by following it with a slipped Reef Knot. It originated for securing cargo in sailing ships.

Look for a big book by Clifford W. Ashley, The Ashley Book of Knots. Amazon has it:

http://www.amazon.co...EYA7F9FYQTW56Z4





-- J.S.
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#4 robert duke

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 06:32 PM

1. Clove hitch: simple easy and quick weight bearing knot. good for tying to a rail or truck side.
2. Bowline: simple easy quick weight bearing knot. Good for making a loop to safety a camera off to.
3. Trucker's hitch: good for tying carts off with when caught without a ratchet strap.
4. figure 8: good fast knot for securing things to the end of a rope.
5. monkey fist> good to sell to comrades as a key chain. takes an afternoon to learn.
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 09:49 PM

Rolling Hitches.

They'll hang on to a second line, pole, etc. better than a clove hitch. There are several varations, the simplest is a clove hitch with an additional first turn.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Rolling_hitch
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 10:09 AM

Rolling Hitches.

They'll hang on to a second line, pole, etc. better than a clove hitch. There are several varations, the simplest is a clove hitch with an additional first turn.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Rolling_hitch


That is a useful one. I've used a rolling hitch for a long time without know the name for it. When I need to tension a line, I pass the rope/cord though an anchor point and tie it back on itself with this knot. It will slide up and down to tighten or loosen but will stay put after that.
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#7 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:32 PM

www.animatedknots.com

learn every knot on that site and become a man.
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#8 Niels Lindelien

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 10:14 PM

The Alpine Butterfly knot is pretty handy too. Learn how to make a Daisy Chain as well, although it's not really a knot.
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:28 PM

www.animatedknots.com

learn every knot on that site and become a man.


That's pretty awesome. I bought the iphone app.
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#10 Tom Jensen

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 01:50 AM

Knot's Landing
Don Knots
Knot's Berry Farm
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 10:27 PM

If you can't tie the knot, tie a lot.
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#12 John Sprung

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:16 PM

Rolling Hitches.


Ah, yes -- another name for what I know as the Adjustable Hitch or Magnus Hitch. ABOK 1734 is the one I use.




-- J.S.
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#13 Chris Millar

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 08:02 PM

hmmm,

you dont need that many :)

Bowline + sheet bend (great for attaching larger line to smaller)
Clovehitch
Two round turns locked of with a half hitch or two (good for lowering/adjusting the height of something heavy as the friction of the turns around a bar/whatever assists)

um, I dont know the name of it but if you make a loop midline you can use that loop as a kind of pully system for extra tension - tie a sheep shank mid line and you can make a double pully system (triple, quadruple purchase?) - someone will now the name of it if it hasn't been mentioned already - used in the back of truck ...

my favourite show off know is the Highwayman's hitch - I can tie it in about 2 secs now - one end will hold your horse when you rob the bank, the other end is a quick release for obvious reasons... Not safe for loads above head

Also you should learn how to properly coil/store a rope so that it uncoils with no knots or twists in it - there are some quite pretty ways to go about this but I can't find any pictures online - basically crochet, but at the larger scale and not as hard or slow as you might think
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#14 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 08:14 PM

I've always liked the Gordion knot. Terrific for tying your ox-cart. Bugger to undo though.
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