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Some help with Nizo Pro Auto B mode


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#1 Jim Train

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 03:23 AM

Hello,

I have borrowed a Nizo Pro camera for a short shoot and would like to use the camera's Auto B mode to capture some slightly abstract footage. From my understanding, this function operates by keeping the shutter open for as long as is necessary to expose the image (for up to 1 minute) whilst shooting a time lapse sequence, is this correct? If that is the case, what would happen if I was to shoot footage with people moving (slowly) during the shot, would it be a complete mess or would I possibly be able to achieve some cool, abstract footage where people could still be picked out?

Any advice on using this function would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
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#2 Justin Donoghue

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 08:08 AM

Hello,

I have borrowed a Nizo Pro camera for a short shoot and would like to use the camera's Auto B mode to capture some slightly abstract footage. From my understanding, this function operates by keeping the shutter open for as long as is necessary to expose the image (for up to 1 minute) whilst shooting a time lapse sequence, is this correct? If that is the case, what would happen if I was to shoot footage with people moving (slowly) during the shot, would it be a complete mess or would I possibly be able to achieve some cool, abstract footage where people could still be picked out?

Any advice on using this function would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.


For me this is one of the best features of this camera. It allows you to film with very low ASA type film at night with time lapse. Recently I used a roll of Kodak 64T with this function and the results were really great. In my experience the process is all totally automatic i.e. depending on lighting conditions and film type etc the camera will expose each frame for as long as required using the sensor on the front of the camera. I used a tripod and was getting approx. 1 fps while filming a city square at night lit up with people walking through it. The static objects always appear sharp but the people walking, cycling etc. will appear like a ghosting effect. Another example which I have not done yet is filming road traffic at night in a city. I'm looking forward to getting that shot even if it is a cliche!

My advice would be to use a tripod or put the camera on something that will not move otherwise your footage will look like a ghosty mess due to the shutter being open for too long.This applies particularly in low light conditions. Have a good percentage of static objects in the shot so that the moving objects will act as a stand out from the static objects. A good test to make sure you're actually in the correct mode on the camera is to start filming without film and put your hand over the sensor above the lens, you will hear the shutter slowing down and once you move your hand away you will hear it speed up. Alternatively you can walk through from a low light room to a bright room and vice versa to test your in the correct mode. In my experience it doesn't always go into Autom B mode first time so this is a good way to prove it, at least not with my Nizo Pro anyway. Hope that helped.

Edited by Justin Donoghue, 25 June 2010 - 08:13 AM.

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#3 luca

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 10:31 AM

hi everybody,

i have bought a Nizo Pro camera..but I don't know how to put batteries in it...it does not have any connectors or anything inside the battery pack/handle thing...all i can see is four screws at the bottom of this...can anyone can help me with this?
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#4 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 27 June 2010 - 05:35 AM

hi everybody,

i have bought a Nizo Pro camera..but I don't know how to put batteries in it...it does not have any connectors or anything inside the battery pack/handle thing...all i can see is four screws at the bottom of this...can anyone can help me with this?



The batteries, 6 x AA NiCd, go in a black plastic container. This then fits in the handle of the camera. The Nizo Professinal can be operated, best on a tripod, with the handle swung back. Keeps a lower profile and the optical axis nearer to the swing point of the head. Other silvery Nizo's need an extra cable for that.

You can also run the camera from a mains adapter. But then you need nearby mains :)
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#5 Jim Train

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 09:35 AM

Thank you for your reply Justin, it is appreciated.

I am still unclear about a few things though. Once I have shot my footage I can choose to have the film telecined at 18fps or 24fps allowing for a choice in playback speed, is that correct? Will the 18fps option will give me a bit more film length albeit at a slower pace?.

Also, if I shoot scenes in different light levels at night, how does that affect things? If I am shooting in a dark area where the camera is shooting at 1fps and the next scene is a bit brighter and comes in at 6fps, that means that darker scene will play back on the finished film with faster moving objects, is that correct?

Finally, I believe that, with the Nizo, you are able to set your own intervals and exposure with the shutter open rather than using the Auto B function, how does this work and what is the benefit?

Sorry for even more questions but I am really keen to get shooting but want to be clear before I spend the little money I have on film and transfer.

Thank you,
Jim
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#6 Justin Donoghue

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 11:31 AM

Thank you for your reply Justin, it is appreciated.

I am still unclear about a few things though. Once I have shot my footage I can choose to have the film telecined at 18fps or 24fps allowing for a choice in playback speed, is that correct? Will the 18fps option will give me a bit more film length albeit at a slower pace?.


No problem. Yeah you will get more film for your money if you film @18fps and your time lapse footage will look a little slower but to be honest I doubt anyone would notice the difference. You obviously would have to film your realtime footage @18fps and transfer @18fps otherwise it would look sped up when played back @24fps. It will still be a 24fps file but it will be bulked out from the 18fps so your footage will still look fine.


Also, if I shoot scenes in different light levels at night, how does that affect things? If I am shooting in a dark area where the camera is shooting at 1fps and the next scene is a bit brighter and comes in at 6fps, that means that darker scene will play back on the finished film with faster moving objects, is that correct?


Yes that's correct if you use the Autom B function i.e. auto exposure. You could always try and slow it down in your editing software though. That way you would have correctly exposed film in different lighting situations but all running at the same speed.I think that might be a trial and error situation.

Finally, I believe that, with the Nizo, you are able to set your own intervals and exposure with the shutter open rather than using the Auto B function, how does this work and what is the benefit?


Yes although I've never tried this you can manually set your own intervals by using a cable release. You would have to calculate how long you want the film exposed for and then manually move the film forward with the cable release. A lot of work involved I would have thought and I'm not sure of the benefit unless you want to get an over exposed look or introduce a kind of exposure flicker with the film. All the settings are the same except you point the dial at the square dot immediately to the right of the Autom B dot.

Nizo Pro manual is here if you haven't already got it:
http://super8exchang...nstructions.php
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#7 Chris Burke

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 03:38 PM

For me this is one of the best features of this camera. It allows you to film with very low ASA type film at night with time lapse. Recently I used a roll of Kodak 64T with this function and the results were really great. In my experience the process is all totally automatic i.e. depending on lighting conditions and film type etc the camera will expose each frame for as long as required using the sensor on the front of the camera. I used a tripod and was getting approx. 1 fps while filming a city square at night lit up with people walking through it. The static objects always appear sharp but the people walking, cycling etc. will appear like a ghosting effect. Another example which I have not done yet is filming road traffic at night in a city. I'm looking forward to getting that shot even if it is a cliche!

My advice would be to use a tripod or put the camera on something that will not move otherwise your footage will look like a ghosty mess due to the shutter being open for too long.This applies particularly in low light conditions. Have a good percentage of static objects in the shot so that the moving objects will act as a stand out from the static objects. A good test to make sure you're actually in the correct mode on the camera is to start filming without film and put your hand over the sensor above the lens, you will hear the shutter slowing down and once you move your hand away you will hear it speed up. Alternatively you can walk through from a low light room to a bright room and vice versa to test your in the correct mode. In my experience it doesn't always go into Autom B mode first time so this is a good way to prove it, at least not with my Nizo Pro anyway. Hope that helped.



can you post some of that footage? I'd love to see it.
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#8 Justin Donoghue

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 05:02 PM

can you post some of that footage? I'd love to see it.



Well as it happens I incorporated the footage into a music video I just completed (my first attempt at a music video so go easy on me). All the night time footage is the Nizo Pro with 64T which was literally a test run which I think turned out well, the rest is a Beaulieu ZM2 with a mixture of 100D and repackaged K40.Feedback/constructive criticism is welcome!


View on Vimeo
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

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Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Visual Products

Glidecam

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

The Slider