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16mm Double Exposure


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#1 Chris Lange

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 07:08 PM

Hello,

Could anyone point me to some writing, in books or online, that delves into the proper technique of double exposure?

I am particularly interested in what kind of images are better for the first layer of recording versus the second? And if any compensation in lighting or f-stop can contribute to the success of a double exposure? I assume so, but really don't know what that should be.

One of the inspirations for my test is Drugstore Cowboy. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks.

Chris
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#2 Fred Neilsen

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 05:40 AM

This link has some very basic information which is specific to the bolex, but some tips apply to other cameras, the 2/3rds stop underexposure...

http://homepage.news...e_exposure.html

I think a lot can be learnt from some very creative "lomography" camera users, there are some amazing double exposures,

http://www.flickr.co...eath/294109328/

Testing, perhaps with a stills camera (if you have one with easy double exposure options) is the best way to go, in my limited double exposure experience, I find that a well lit subject with a dark background, re-exposed with something quite underexposed (or something with a large amount of black/dark colour) is the best plan of attack, you probably don't want two bright objects on top of each other. Another thing to keep in mind is camera movement, with one of the exposures probably needing to be locked off though then again, it's double exposure, one of the areas of cinematography with the least amount of rules, and the probably the most creative options.
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#3 Simon Wyss

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 03:08 PM

Double exposure calls for a camera with a precision movement. That is a mechanism with at least moving register pin(s) if not one with fixed pilot pins. It takes perfect register in order to not destroy the desired effect.

Exposures need to be calculated according to the photographic properties of the final image. If you blend two medium shots it's simple, close one full stop for each one. Something darker in a cloudy sky for example will go as is. Try and tell us.
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#4 Chris Lange

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 08:14 PM

Thanks a lot guys!

I'm going to give it a shot in July. I'll plan an experiment with bracketing. I'll let you know how it goes.

Chris
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Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc