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Any thoughts on how they might do this? (extreme slow-mo)


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#1 Remsy Atassi

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 10:20 AM

Check this out.


I have a producer who insists this was done with some kind of a plugin or using stills. To me it just looks overcranking on a steadicam with everyone in the room holding a position. There are some weird time effects, such as the nurses hair, but even that seems like something easily produced by hair and makeup.

Ultimately this producer is looking to write a similar ad and is hoping to sell it, so it would be great if someone with more experience on this stuff could clear it up.

Thanks in advance,
Remsy
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#2 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 01:01 PM

Check this out.


I have a producer who insists this was done with some kind of a plugin or using stills. To me it just looks overcranking on a steadicam with everyone in the room holding a position. There are some weird time effects, such as the nurses hair, but even that seems like something easily produced by hair and makeup.

Ultimately this producer is looking to write a similar ad and is hoping to sell it, so it would be great if someone with more experience on this stuff could clear it up.

Thanks in advance,
Remsy


Usually there are several elements used to sell this effect.

One is slow mo with everyone holding positions.

Another is props/ hair that are manipulated to look like they are frozen

And another is the addition of cg elements (such as water or particles) and the painting out of wires used to help people hold uncomfortable positions.

Stills and plug ins can be used to create a similar but limited effect (that is, perspective shift is hard to create effectively when using stills)

This one looks to me like a lot of it was done practically due to the shifting perspective and reflections.

Also, the CG (as you can see in the obvious cheap flare plugin) is horribly bad, which makes it seem unlikely to me that they could handle everything else relatively well.
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#3 Matthew Conrad

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 11:03 PM

haha, I love that a producer would insist it was a plugin.

I think it was trick-acting, and overcranked on steadicam. But there is a weird look to it. at times it loops like its 60p motion.

check out this spot.


here's a behind the scenes about it. pretty awesome stuff.


-matt
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#4 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:50 AM

I'm pretty positive it was shot both high speed and on steadicam. The steadicam is pretty obvious since they lose horizon just a bit at the end. The high speed helps because the people don't have to freeze as long and it smooths out most imperfections in the shot.
That silly flashlight flare really took me out of the spot.
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