Jump to content


Photo

Minimum to show my film in theatre


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Lance Tang

Lance Tang
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 27 July 2010 - 04:11 PM

Ok so lets say hypothetically my indie film was going to be picked up for distribution in theatres.

What kind of format, for example is 1080p good enough for theatres?

Do they need seperate audio/dialogue tracks?

Anything else that would be required for wide distribution?
  • 0

#2 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11947 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 July 2010 - 04:25 PM

Usually if your movie is going to be distributed then the distributor will be eager to supply you with a list of things you must supply to them. This will include technical articles such as the things you discuss as well as legal paperwork and promotional materials such as on-set photography.

Many widely distributed films are produced in "1080p" or some very near equivalent, but it's a weasel number behind which are a lot of other factors. A Canon 5D theoretically creates a 1080p image; so does a Sony F35. Clearly one is objectively superior in many ways. Either way most modern delivery lists will ask for the film to be supplied on HDCAM(SR). In terms of delivery, there will usually be a requirement to include the (satisfactory!) report of a quality control assessor and it is at this point that your decisions will be validated - or otherwise.

Most delivery lists will include an M&E (music and effects) sound track requirement, which will form the basis of dubbing for markets which don't speak the language in which your film was made. Depending on the sophistication of your postproduction provisions you may be able to put these tracks on the same master as the picture and main soundtrack, or you may do it some other way.

Beyond this the specifics get fairly complicated and are best dealt with on a case by case basis.

P
  • 0

#3 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 27 July 2010 - 04:47 PM

Exactly as Phil said, and normally 1080 is ok (though in film we'd go by 1920,as the horizontal doesn't change but the vertical does depending on aspect ratio,) since it's very close to 2K (2046, I think?). I've screened off of a BR before in a theater, and the results were acceptable... not blockbuster film material at all, but far better than projecting an SD. You will be given a list of things by a distributor of what they need, one of which certainly will be an HD tape master (i'd say almost universally HDCamSR.. though sometimes other formats, such as D5) so it'd be a good idea to make at least 1 copy of the finished film on an HDCamSR tape... if anything you can downconvert tape to tape from that to any other format with relative ease.
  • 0

#4 Ravi Kiran

Ravi Kiran
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:33 PM

Some distributors will ask for a 4:3 open-matte/pan-and-scan transfers too. Distributors usually want a textless version of the film if there are credits or other text elements superimposed on the picture. You will probably have to provide a stereo LtRt mix of the soundtrack as well as the 5.1 mix. These requirements vary from distributor to distributor.

Edited by Ravi Kiran, 27 July 2010 - 05:38 PM.

  • 0

#5 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 27 July 2010 - 07:19 PM

Anything else that would be required for wide distribution?


Releases for all the actors etc.
List of music and clearance type stuff related to it.

Theres a lot of paperwork involved.
  • 0

#6 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 27 July 2010 - 07:54 PM

Not to be negative, only realistic, indie movies getting theatrical releases are one in a million.

Sorry, but that's the reality. Have a look at the number of "service deals" coming out of Sundance for even the biggest titles. This means the producer pays for all of the P&A, not the distributor.

R,
  • 0

#7 Lance Tang

Lance Tang
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:45 PM

Not to be negative, only realistic, indie movies getting theatrical releases are one in a million.

Sorry, but that's the reality. Have a look at the number of "service deals" coming out of Sundance for even the biggest titles. This means the producer pays for all of the P&A, not the distributor.

R,


It's always better to be prepared. Also there are many indie films shown in theaters but not in a wide release.

- Lance
  • 0

#8 Justin Hayward

Justin Hayward
  • Sustaining Members
  • 928 posts
  • Director
  • Chicago, IL.

Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:36 PM

Have a look at the number of "service deals" coming out of Sundance for even the biggest titles.


Film festivals play their films in theaters, so even if he doesn’t sell from Sundance, he’s going to need something to play there and they don’t take DVD’s.

Of course I’m talking about the bigger ones – not the Rockford Illinois International…
  • 0

#9 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 28 July 2010 - 11:24 PM

Film festivals play their films in theaters, so even if he doesn’t sell from Sundance, he’s going to need something to play there and they don’t take DVD’s.

Of course I’m talking about the bigger ones – not the Rockford Illinois International…


Sundance will take HDCAM. Most of the others are now projecting off of DVD because they don't want to spend the money to bring in decks.

Only the biggest of festivals have proper HD projection.

R,
  • 0

#10 Justin Hayward

Justin Hayward
  • Sustaining Members
  • 928 posts
  • Director
  • Chicago, IL.

Posted 29 July 2010 - 01:25 AM

Only the biggest of festivals have proper HD projection.


I thought that's what I said.
  • 0

#11 Sean Lambrecht

Sean Lambrecht
  • Sustaining Members
  • 77 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Milwaukee / Chicago

Posted 29 July 2010 - 03:08 PM

...since it's very close to 2K (2046, I think?).


It's 2048, you're thinking of the Kar Wai Wong film I think. ;)
Throws me off sometimes...
  • 0

#12 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 29 July 2010 - 03:14 PM

Damn you Chris Doyle; you and your shenanigans got my brain all pudding-fied.
  • 0

#13 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1675 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 08 August 2010 - 10:00 AM

Sundance will take HDCAM. Most of the others are now projecting off of DVD because they don't want to spend the money to bring in decks.

Only the biggest of festivals have proper HD projection.

R,



how about blu ray? are many large or small festivals using this format for projection? I can burn blu ray discs at home. What are other peoples experience with BR?
  • 0


Glidecam

Visual Products

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

The Slider

Opal

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera