Jump to content


Photo

footage


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Diana G Palombaro

Diana G Palombaro
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Student

Posted 05 August 2010 - 08:34 AM

Soon gonna shoot a short film of about 15 minutes , how shoul I calculate how many meters of film stock do I need?

thanks guys
  • 0

#2 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1720 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 05 August 2010 - 02:35 PM

Soon gonna shoot a short film of about 15 minutes , how shoul I calculate how many meters of film stock do I need?

thanks guys



you should calculate based upon the shooting ratio to be used
  • 0

#3 Diana G Palombaro

Diana G Palombaro
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Student

Posted 06 August 2010 - 09:52 AM

you should calculate based upon the shooting ratio to be used


ex: 3:1 for about 15 minutes 450m (35mm) let's say a stock of 1500?
  • 0

#4 Steve Zimmerman

Steve Zimmerman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 196 posts
  • Other
  • Charleston, SC USA

Posted 06 August 2010 - 12:53 PM

Kodak's online film calculator:

http://motion.kodak....//www.kodak.com - Film Calculator&flashWidth=600&flashHeight=400&flashBgColour=FFFFFF&WindowBgColour=FFFFFF
  • 0

#5 Nicholas Rapak

Nicholas Rapak
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:34 PM

Kodak's online film calculator:




I never knew this existed. Thanks for finding this!
  • 0

#6 Bill DiPietra

Bill DiPietra
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2339 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York City

Posted 06 August 2010 - 05:25 PM

you should calculate based upon the shooting ratio to be used



There are all sorts of short films. Is this a narrative with actors and the whole nine yards? Or is this more experimental?

What kind of film it is will also give you a gauge as to how much prep you will need. For example, how I directed my first narrative short was COMPLETELY different from the way I directed my first avant-garde short.
  • 0

#7 Diana G Palombaro

Diana G Palombaro
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Student

Posted 07 August 2010 - 07:25 AM

There are all sorts of short films. Is this a narrative with actors and the whole nine yards? Or is this more experimental?

What kind of film it is will also give you a gauge as to how much prep you will need. For example, how I directed my first narrative short was COMPLETELY different from the way I directed my first avant-garde short.


Yeah, a nattive one..shots planned, no improvisation
  • 0

#8 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1720 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 07 August 2010 - 02:02 PM

ex: 3:1 for about 15 minutes 450m (35mm) let's say a stock of 1500?



that is a very low ratio. it can be done, but leaves no room for error. if you can afford it 8:1 is a low safe ratio.
  • 0

#9 David Owen James

David Owen James
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 83 posts
  • Director
  • British Columbia

Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:45 PM

What is an average film shooting ratio?

Edited by David Owen James, 10 January 2013 - 04:46 PM.

  • 0

#10 Matthew W. Phillips

Matthew W. Phillips
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1792 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:33 PM

5:1 always worked for me. 3:1 almost ruined my film. 8:1 is more than safe. 10:1 is getting greedy. :D
  • 0

#11 Mike Tounian

Mike Tounian
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Student

Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:58 PM

It all depends on the type of film you are making and the difficulties involved. From what I've been told, the average studio feature plans for a 8:1 ratio but they usually end up higher. My thesis at USC had a 12:1 ratio, and that was on 3-perf, but we had blank firing machine guns, choreography with a swing band armed to the teeth, moving vehicles, etc. so we had to do that.

If you end up making an easier narrative that is mostly just people "talking or doing poop" you can probably get away with 5:1, but I'd go 6:1 to be safe.
  • 0

#12 Matthew W. Phillips

Matthew W. Phillips
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1792 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:03 PM

A lot of it has to do with whose money is being used. People talk all this crapola of 12:1 and higher but not on their own dime, they arent! If you have studio backing and others dough, hell, shoot what you can get away with! If its your money, I guarantee youll keep it tight. Just being real with you.
  • 0

#13 Matt Stevens

Matt Stevens
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 705 posts
  • Other

Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

I have tended to be 3:1 but I rehearse rehearse rehearse. That ratio is for a short film. i have yet to try a feature.
  • 0

#14 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2658 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:52 PM

3:1 is really tight for coverage. 6:1 is doable.
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment