Jump to content


Photo

Remove lens during shooting


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Georgi Andreev

Georgi Andreev

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 13 August 2010 - 09:21 AM

Hello, is there anybody, who has tried to remove the lens while shooting and then put it back on. Also if anybody can give me a link for such a video or footage.I'm really curios about the effect we got?

Thanks
  • 0

#2 Steve Zimmerman

Steve Zimmerman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 196 posts
  • Other
  • Charleston, SC USA

Posted 13 August 2010 - 10:10 AM

Hello, is there anybody, who has tried to remove the lens while shooting and then put it back on. Also if anybody can give me a link for such a video or footage.I'm really curios about the effect we got?

Thanks


David Lynch called it "wacking", and used it a few times in Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive.
You can see it here at 1:42. They were also using a net filter on the shot.


http://www.thecityof...n/whacking.html
http://www.thecityof...ntlhdeming.html (second page, middle of page)
  • 0

#3 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11947 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 August 2010 - 10:18 AM

I'm not so sure about this. I've done it on video cameras and DSLRs. If you just gently rock the lens in the mount, of course you end up with some very extreme out-of-focus effects and flaring as light leaks in through the gaps, which could be quite interesting. If you actually completely remove the lens from the mount, the overwhelmingly large amount of light that floods in just tends to produce a rather uninteresting white bleached frame which doesn't really do anything much for me.

P
  • 0

#4 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 August 2010 - 02:02 PM

Another thing you can do on some cameras is rotate the turret. You get a kind of distorted wipe with black in the middle, and a new focal length. I remember a student film from long ago, they had the actor walk up to the camera and do that....



-- J.S.
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11947 posts
  • Other

Posted 13 August 2010 - 02:55 PM

I think Top Gear ran the entire gauntlet of "bouncing the extender in and out during the shot" techniques about five years ago. Twice.
  • 0

#6 Peter J DeCrescenzo

Peter J DeCrescenzo
  • Sustaining Members
  • 620 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Portland, OR, USA www.peterdv.com Blog: http://herefortheweather.wordpress.com/

Posted 13 August 2010 - 03:30 PM

FYI: Hunter Richards posted this footage he shot using a GH1 (before he update his cam with the firmware hack). In the thread he mentions he "flashed" the sensor by partially removing the lens during shooting:

View on Vimeo
  • 0

#7 Greg Gross

Greg Gross
  • Sustaining Members
  • 869 posts
  • Harrisburg,PA

Posted 18 August 2010 - 01:06 PM

Mulholland Drive is one of my favorite films. Does anybody know in which scenes Mr. Lynch used "wacking"? I have it here but have not watched it for a while but probably
could figure it out. Thinking about trying this in a short film. Looking at it as sort of a new, personal adventure in film/digital. Liked the Hunter Richard's production.
Greg Gross
  • 0

#8 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 18 August 2010 - 01:12 PM

I think Top Gear ran the entire gauntlet of "bouncing the extender in and out during the shot" techniques about five years ago. Twice.


There was also the fashion for a while of holding the extender half way, so that both images were superimposed upon each other.
  • 0

#9 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:25 PM

There was also the fashion for a while of holding the extender half way, so that both images were superimposed upon each other.


Hell, I just did that this spring on a show for MTV.
  • 0

#10 grant mcphee

grant mcphee
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • UK, Scotland

Posted 19 August 2010 - 07:39 AM

Whacking:

I worked on a feature with Peter Deming a few years ago. On the first day he used this technique. It was using a PanArri 435. He had the focus puller remove the lens in different variations while either he or the fp used the rcd to run/stop the camera in time with the lens removal, and at different fps. It looked great on the monitor but never saw the full effect as it never made the final cut of the film.

I've been on shoots where the dop managed something similar using the macro focus ring on eng lenses.
  • 0

#11 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 September 2010 - 11:05 AM

How safe would it be to do something like this on Arricam SR3?
I considered to do it on my last short - but we shot on a beach and constant sandstorms prooved it to be extremely risky.
How bad is it for the camera/mirror/gate?
  • 0

#12 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 12 September 2010 - 11:37 AM

It shouldn't effect the mirror or gate etc, so long as the butt of your lens isn't protruding too close "e.g. close enough to risk contact if angled the wrong way," to the camera. When you're twisting your PL mount, the only thing you're effecting is the holder for the lens, ya know. I'd just make doubly sure the lenses you're going to do this with don't remotely risk impacting the mirror shutter.
  • 0

#13 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 September 2010 - 01:11 PM

But that's kind of the queston - how do you check it? Apart from taking some standard sr2 and smashing the rolling shutter, while testing :)
  • 0

#14 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 12 September 2010 - 01:16 PM

Well, one way you can check it is @ prep, inch the shutter of the SR open, and gently nestle the lens in there at different angles and see how much room you've got.
  • 0

#15 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 12 September 2010 - 01:38 PM

Kind of did this on the shoot - but as the whole film was hand-held this proved to be extremely difficult to get any decent lensbaby-ish effect...
:)
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Glidecam

Abel Cine