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Lighting with Fluorescents


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#1 John M

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 08:20 PM

Hi there,

Just found the site and this is my first post.

So I've decided after about 15 years to get back into Cinematography. The last time I shot anything was with an Arri BL 16mm. Now I'm starting all over again, but this time with video like the RED ONE, Sony XD. I had a good understanding about lighting for film. Is there going to be much difference with lighting for video? What I would really like to know is what's the best way to go when lighting a room using existing overhead fluorescent lighting? It's more there for an effect that we are after. Just enhances the general look of the particular room. I know with film, gels and what not were needed to compensate, however with Video and all thats available with the technology, do the same principles apply?

Edited by John M, 13 August 2010 - 08:23 PM.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 11:00 PM

Same ideas, each camera will have it's own little quirks. Some folks like the white balance, others like to work with filters. Biggest difference is the sharpness of the systems (far sharper than 16mm.. not always a good think) and a far more truncated dynamic range -v- film stock. Control your highlights with video and you'll be good (-v- in film, control your shadows).
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 12:15 AM

The bad news is you have less dynamic range than you did with film. The good news is that you can see in your video village exactly what you're getting, and fill to fix it. The bad news is that the producers, director, etc. can also look at the picture as you shoot, which in some cases leads to debate and delay....



-- J.S.
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#4 John M

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:01 AM

Same ideas, each camera will have it's own little quirks. Some folks like the white balance, others like to work with filters. Biggest difference is the sharpness of the systems (far sharper than 16mm.. not always a good think) and a far more truncated dynamic range -v- film stock. Control your highlights with video and you'll be good (-v- in film, control your shadows).



Not a big fan of the white balance, I think i'd rather go the filter route. So I would figure out my Fluorescents colour temp, and filter the key, back , fills etc....etc to keep everything under the same light? Theres far to many overhead fluorescents to try and filter. Sorry I tend to overthink sometimes. Just want to educate myself as m uch as possible before I start anything.
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:11 AM

you can work the other way; by filtering just the heads you bring in with +green after finding out the floros color temp. Though sometimes, the god will smile on you nd you'll get some high CRI floros that just act as daylight sources.
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#6 John M

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 09:49 AM

you can work the other way; by filtering just the heads you bring in with +green after finding out the floros color temp. Though sometimes, the god will smile on you nd you'll get some high CRI floros that just act as daylight sources.



Thanks for the tips. Do you have any recommended reading on this subject
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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 01:50 AM

you can work the other way; by filtering just the heads you bring in with +green after finding out the floros color temp.


Depends who you're working for. Plus green can scare the uninformed..... ;-)




-- J.S.
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#8 John M

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 06:14 AM

I understand the idea of adding green to one source or take it away from another. However, when adding green, what generally happens to skin tone on Video like a Red One or SONY EX system?
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#9 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:58 AM

Turns green. Idea being you can pull it out later on in color correction and /or balance out in the camera via white balance. all depends on what system you're working with.
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Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

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Technodolly

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Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Tai Audio