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Shooting film straight from the fridge


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#1 Jim Train

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 09:34 AM

A bit of a no-brainer for many here I'm sure but the truth is that I am not sure if it is okay to shoot film straight out of the fridge - not the freezer!

Kids were playing the other day, something hilarious happened and I grabbed a cart from the fridge then thought, "hmmm.. I wonder if I need the make any exposure compensation for cold film" then thought "hmmm... I haven't a clue." Just shot the film as is.

Thank you
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 05:47 PM

Nah, should be fine. The whole freezer thing isn't even so much so about exposure compensation, rather that film-- like most things-- gets brittle when cold; hence the want to let film "defrost."
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#3 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 07:32 PM

A bit of a no-brainer for many here I'm sure but the truth is that I am not sure if it is okay to shoot film straight out of the fridge - not the freezer!

Kids were playing the other day, something hilarious happened and I grabbed a cart from the fridge then thought, "hmmm.. I wonder if I need the make any exposure compensation for cold film" then thought "hmmm... I haven't a clue." Just shot the film as is.

Thank you


the risk with taking film directly from the fridge, opening the sealed package and shooting right away is condensation on the film. Ideally you whould wait until the sealed film is brought to ambient temperature before opening the seal to avoid condensation forming on the film. But if you have to shoot, just shoot and see if you get away with it. With super 8 a major issue with condensation is film getting jammed in the cartridge. Also, film with condensation on it can have problems with static flashes: the wet film gets sticky as it dries and sticks to the neighbouring film, then when the film is peeled apart for processing a flash can be generated which is visible on the processed film. That is the risk. So the problem with fridge temperature film is not an exposure thing, its a condensation thing.
richard

Edited by Richard Tuohy, 14 August 2010 - 07:33 PM.

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#4 Jim Train

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:53 AM

Thanks guys, will keep that in mind in future.
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