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composition of an image


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#1 Jim Nelson

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 09:18 PM

Hi,

I'm quite new at filmmaking so please don't be harsh :) I know composition means: arranging elements of a scene or image in such a way that they are visually pleasing, emotionally moving, etc.

What I don't understand is what "arranging" means here? And how can you do that so they are visually pleasing and emotionally moving?


Thanks for your help :)

Edited by Jim Nelson, 16 August 2010 - 09:18 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:09 PM

Arrange means to move objects around, or move the camera so that the positions of (unmovable) objects relative to other objects appear in a pattern you like. There are certain reoccurring patterns in art, like arranging objects in a receding diagonal, putting a horizon line in the bottom third or top third (or the whole general "Rule of Thirds" for composition in general), finding "X" patterns that draw the eye to the center of the "X" (you see this in landscape paintings often).
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#3 Jim Nelson

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:25 PM

Thank you very much for your help :)

What do you mean by "pattern" here?

And how do I move the objects or the camera around so that it conveys emotions?

Edited by Jim Nelson, 16 August 2010 - 10:26 PM.

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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 10:33 PM

Pattern; any set of objects, which may or may not be recurring (e.g. trees in a wide shot) or people in a scene, or even just "planes," in the frame.

I'd say to learn good composition, look at images which you think are composed well, or better yet, get a digital stills camera, and shoot a stationary object in a variety of ways (center frame, left frame, right frame, bottom frame, top frame) and think about how it makes you feel.

Then try to arrange objects (anything really) to lead the eye from point a to b or a to b to c.
Then try to find ideal arrangements, for you, in the real world and photograph them.

Hell, post the photos up on here and ask others how you can improve a composition.
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#5 Jim Nelson

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 05:09 PM

Thank you very much :)

How can you lead the eye from point A to B to C?
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 06:19 PM

Thank you very much :)

How can you lead the eye from point A to B to C?


It can be as simple as how the subjects in the composition look at or relate to each other.
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#7 Jim Nelson

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 02:00 PM

I'm sorry but I don't know what that means :(
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#8 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 03:12 PM

Look at how Caravaggio places people in his paintings and how they interrelate to each other to create a composition that conveys a story or an emotion.

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Caravaggio

http://caravaggio.co...collection.html
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#9 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 04:59 AM

I would suggest the book "The Visual Story, Second Edition: Creating the Visual Structure of Film, TV and Digital Media"
from Bruce Block.

@ Amazon's site take a look inside the book.

A very interesting book about the visual components and how they can serve the story...

That what i like to convey about the book is better done by the editorial reviews.
Here some quotes:


Editorial Reviews

"Bruce Block has a unique knowledge and understanding of the visual structure of film. The Visual Story is the only book of its kind. it will teach you to become a better storyteller through the use of visuals." - Nancy Meyers, Director of "Something's Gotta Give" and "The Holiday"

"Bruce Block masterfully deconstructs visual storytelling. Exposure to this material is essential for all students of cinema. This book will make you a better filmmaker." --American Film Institute

"Bruce Block's work gives the visual storyteller a framework for making story-driven decisions, not just visual choices. It gives the filmmaker tools to create harmony and counterpoint between the story structure and its visual realization on the screen." --Randy Nelson, Dean of Pixar University, Pixar Animation Studios

"No matter what kind of visual storyteller you are, whether a filmmaker, photographer, or graphic designer, Bruce Block explains how visual narrative works in a way that is clear and accessible." --David Pagani, Creative Director-On Air, DIRECTV

"Bruce Block is legendary in the field of broadcast design. His profound insight into the art of visual storytelling will forever change the way you work." --Dan Pappalardo, Executive Creative Director/Partner, Troika Design Group

"I spend much of my time in pre-production quoting Bruce Block to my cinematographers, production designers, costume designers, and editors. In all my years in the business I've never found a clearer more useful articulation of film grammar." --Jay Roach, director of Austin Powers, Meet the Parents, and Meet the Fockers




Best

Igor

Edited by Igor Trajkovski, 23 August 2010 - 05:03 AM.

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#10 Robert Costello

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 09:37 AM

This is kind of fun:
http://www.animation...omposition.html

You should take a survey course in art history or at least go to the library and reseach art theory regarding composition, line, and color- maybe more so than subject matter-

In a motion picture, you are of course, 'sculpting with time'

look for the relationship between architecture and motion pictures: the experiential sequence.
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The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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