Jump to content


Photo

CANON 5D RAW TIMELAPSE FOR FILM OUT


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Ted Chu

Ted Chu
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 17 August 2010 - 01:39 PM

Comments/practical suggestions on shooting RAW (time lapse only) for theatrical release? Will it match 35mm principal photography shot with an Arriflex/Cooke primes? Thanks.
  • 0

#2 Phil Holland

Phil Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 18 August 2010 - 09:00 PM

I've done quite a few timelapses for the big screen.

Here's some tips:
-Use a good lens
-Shoot in Manual Mode
-There's a trick to locking the aperture on Canon lenses by using the "depth of field preview" button on the front of the camera and slightly disengaging the lens. This fixes the aperture and will eliminate any iris variation that would cause flicker.
-Shoot in Camera RAW.
-Process the files with a "linear" curve with as much of the shadow detail visible.
-Don't do much to the contrast or saturation.

If you are concerned about anything really matching, it's a great idea to see a frame of what you are working with. Otherwise this would be enough for a colorist to play with.

In terms of it matching cinema primes, in terms of quality you shouldn't be too worried. However, if you are attempting match say a Cooke 50mm you'll want to shoot with something in the 85mm range to match the field of view.

Hope that helps,

Phil
  • 0

#3 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 31 August 2010 - 12:30 AM

Phil, can you elaborate on this statement?:

"-There's a trick to locking the aperture on Canon lenses by using the "depth of field preview" button on the front of the camera and slightly disengaging the lens. This fixes the aperture and will eliminate any iris variation that would cause flicker."

What do you mean "disengaging the lens"?

It's not hard to set a lens to manual focus.
What's the purpose of disengaging the lens?
(And how would one do that anyway?)

MP
  • 0

#4 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:10 AM

Just make sure you have it on manual or you will have some terrible strobing!
  • 0

#5 Anamitra Chakladar

Anamitra Chakladar

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:05 AM

Shoot on camera RAW...and then process it on Lightroom and crop it on the aspect ratio that you will eventually require, convert to JPEGs...and then use Quick Time PRo to lay them one after another...and then export them...you are in business...the file sizes are almost 4k rez...good for Red One.
  • 0

#6 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 12161 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 January 2011 - 04:00 AM

More "quite a lot better than" Red One.
  • 0

#7 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3345 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 January 2011 - 06:06 AM

the file sizes are almost 4k rez...good for Red One.


The OP stated that he was intercutting with 35mm, not RED. I know it's hard to believe, but there are still some people NOT shooting on RED. ;)
  • 0

#8 Scott Larson

Scott Larson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
  • Other
  • Portland, OR

Posted 11 January 2011 - 06:08 PM

Phil, can you elaborate on this statement?:

"-There's a trick to locking the aperture on Canon lenses by using the "depth of field preview" button on the front of the camera and slightly disengaging the lens. This fixes the aperture and will eliminate any iris variation that would cause flicker."

What do you mean "disengaging the lens"?

If you want the aperture in a Canon EF lens to stay at a certain f stop, you can use the DOF preview button to set it to that f stop, and then rotate the lens just enough so the pins on the lens no longer make contact with the camera but not so far that the lens falls out. This means simultaneously pressing the DOF preview and lens release buttons.

I don't know why you would do this. The camera will not expose until the aperture is set correctly.
  • 0

#9 Dave Blackham

Dave Blackham

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 14 May 2011 - 04:22 PM

If you want the aperture in a Canon EF lens to stay at a certain f stop, you can use the DOF preview button to set it to that f stop, and then rotate the lens just enough so the pins on the lens no longer make contact with the camera but not so far that the lens falls out. This means simultaneously pressing the DOF preview and lens release buttons.

I don't know why you would do this. The camera will not expose until the aperture is set correctly.


When you rotate the lens the viewfinder aperture setting displays '00' its about 1m to 2mm rotation, if you turn it too far then the camera display's an error after taking one exposure. if this happens just turn the lens back a bit. I lock it with a small piece of camera tape though it doesn't really need it. Also if its a short zoom 16 35mm lock the zoom ring with camera tape also.
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks