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Low-Budget Feature, Red One with Zeiss glass


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#1 ryan knight

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 03:29 PM

Howdy all,

I'm starting a low-budget feature in a few weeks, and I haven't been this excited about a screenplay in a long time. The story is very strong and the characters are well developed. It's a character drama, with strong elements of thriller with supernatural material and some beats of horror.

The Director and I have discussed going with a semi-documentary approach, trying to enhance a sense of 'realism'. However, the Director has requested this look should come predominantly from the lighting, and not hand-held camera work (though there will be some hand-held coverage).

Can someone point me towards a film that shares this aesthetic: lighting that derives significantly from "available light" and practicals, that is less glossy (but not sloppy), perhaps a little harsher in shadow quality, yet does not use a lot of hand-held?

Thanks so much fellows. I can't wait to start photography!
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#2 Scot McPhie

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 06:47 AM

The Australian film The Irishman has a lot of high contrast natural light photography in it. I don't know what the exposure lattitude of the Red is like - or how contrasty your light is -- here in Australia it's very bright. Barry Lyndon is of course the famous natural light film - shot in softer northern hemisphere conditions

Scot
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#3 ryan knight

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 08:42 AM

I'd love to be able to find the Irishman somewhere (perhaps online?) and I wish I had the time to watch Barry Lyndon (3+ hours).

I remember hearing great things about its photography, and the special NASA made lenses (I think I'm talking about the right pic).

I did, however, budget 2 and change to watch There Will Be Blood.

Thanks so much for the references. Too bad I couldn't benefit from them.

RK.
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#4 John Holland

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 12:28 PM

If you cant spend 3 hours out of your busy life to watch " Barry Lyndon " then you shouldnt be let near any sort of camera !!
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 02:10 AM

Why ask for references if you're just going to ignore them? People spend hundreds of hours researching before shooting a film. If you can't spend a few hours watching a film you might be spending your time on the wrong things.
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#6 Frank Glencairn

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 02:48 AM

This here may be an extreme example, cause I shot it in only one and a half hour under available light without any preplanning or preparation but full batteries.

But It may be a bit of inspiration:

Frank
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