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#1 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 07:25 PM

I'd like to know if anyone knows of any labs that still do post-flashing. I don't know of any way to pre-flash 16mm film (I have an ARRI S/B.) Is this process only done with Panaflashers on 35mm films? Or is there also a way to do it with 16mm film?

Thanks a lot.
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#2 Brian Rose

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 07:49 PM

Actually, you could pre-flash your neg. In fact, it's easier with 16mm than 35. You see, when flashing 35mm, which is four perfs, you have to mark the perf that is grabbed by the pulldown claw, otherwise when you shoot, you could wind up with an image that's half flashed, half normal, or 3/4s flashed...

With 16mm, which is one perf high, you don't have to worry about this step.

The rest of the process is fairly basic. You need a lightsource with heavy diffusion. Ansel Adams describes flashing in one of his books, and how he used a simple box made of card stock mounted on a light with a piece of white diffusion on the business end. You'd need color filters depending on the shade of the flash you want to achieve (Vilmos Zsigmond used yellow filtered light to give the negative for "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" a distinct yellow bias).

Then, it's just a matter of pointing your camera at the light source and shooting! You want to ensure it's a good camera, because you're essentially running the negative through twice (preflash, and then principle photography), so you don't want it coming out scratched on the first go around!

As for exposure, you'd have to experiment, but I've read for the best results you want to underexpose your film by four stops. This gives the resulting film an extra stop to work with, so if you're using 400, you'd treat is as 800 ASA. You'd really want to do some camera tests.

Lastly, you'll need a reel-to-reel, because once you've shot the film, you'll need to respool it, since the sprockets are backwards. In this regard, you'd be best off using 100 foot daylight reels...cores could get messy. I've gotten daylight reels and lightight boxes for free from my lab. They have a lot on hand left over from jobs, and are glad to get rid of them. I asked for a few, and they sent me thirty! (Thanks Cinelab!)

Hope this helps!

BR
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 10:38 AM

Actually, you could pre-flash your neg. In fact, it's easier with 16mm than 35. You see, when flashing 35mm, which is four perfs, you have to mark the perf that is grabbed by the pulldown claw, otherwise when you shoot, you could wind up with an image that's half flashed, half normal, or 3/4s flashed...

With 16mm, which is one perf high, you don't have to worry about this step.

The rest of the process is fairly basic. You need a lightsource with heavy diffusion. Ansel Adams describes flashing in one of his books, and how he used a simple box made of card stock mounted on a light with a piece of white diffusion on the business end. You'd need color filters depending on the shade of the flash you want to achieve (Vilmos Zsigmond used yellow filtered light to give the negative for "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" a distinct yellow bias).

Then, it's just a matter of pointing your camera at the light source and shooting! You want to ensure it's a good camera, because you're essentially running the negative through twice (preflash, and then principle photography), so you don't want it coming out scratched on the first go around!

As for exposure, you'd have to experiment, but I've read for the best results you want to underexpose your film by four stops. This gives the resulting film an extra stop to work with, so if you're using 400, you'd treat is as 800 ASA. You'd really want to do some camera tests.

Lastly, you'll need a reel-to-reel, because once you've shot the film, you'll need to respool it, since the sprockets are backwards. In this regard, you'd be best off using 100 foot daylight reels...cores could get messy. I've gotten daylight reels and lightight boxes for free from my lab. They have a lot on hand left over from jobs, and are glad to get rid of them. I asked for a few, and they sent me thirty! (Thanks Cinelab!)

Hope this helps!

BR


Thanks, Brian.

How large a light-source are we talking about?
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#4 Karel Bata

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 11:03 AM

Or use Freddie Francis' Varicon. I loved it!. You can see what's happening in the viewfinder and dial in degrees of the effect. Here's a pic quite strangely showing it upside down, as this way up it would fall out of the filter slot (unless you gaffer taped it in!):


Posted Image

As well as lifting the shadows, you can slip gels in to color them. Here's a still from something I lit with some orange in. With the Varicon switched off half that bookcase would be black. Saves a lot of trouble rigging fill lights, particluarly in awkward corners. You have to keep scrupulous notes as you go along, otherwise you'll have difficulty matching shots later. Let's see if this uploads...

Posted Image


Ah! :D

Freddie Francis won Best Cinematography Oscar using it on Glory. Such a nice man too. Very much missed.

Because you can actually see the effect through the viewfinder you simply creep the level up till your happy. There's no '10%' or whatever on a Varicon, like you get in flashing (and technically I'm not really sure it's the same thing, more like a variable fog filter). I would imagine with flashing (never done it) you'd be more inclined to err on the side of caution. Freddie Francis took it to the limit on Dune, and the subject suited that, but he was much more subtle on Glory. I like the fact that you can switch colors for different scenes too, on the hoof, and while on the same mag.

Been largely made redundant now by DI. :( Might be a bit cumbersome for 16mm.

http://web.mac.com/m...7EAF52708E.html

http://www.cinematog...ges/VARICON.HTM

Brian - is flashing in camera the same thing as flashing in the lab after the neg has been exposed? I would have thought it was, but someone once told me that the Varicon is subtly different from a Panaflasher because it adds light during principal exposure, while flashing with a Panaflasher kind of 'primes' the neg. If so, then flashing in the lab would be different again, would it not..?
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

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Visual Products

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Glidecam

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rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal