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wide shot to ECU of an eye, one take


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#1 Bobby Shore

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 04:00 PM

hey,

I have a project where the director i wants a subject to walk from a wide shot (probably starting from about 20 feet away), into an ECU of the subject's eye. we'll be shooting on a soundstage with the RED MX, so shooting at a deep stop is definitely doable. I was thinking about using the clairmont swing/tilt macro lens system, does anyone have experience with it? Or do you think a I could achieve the shot with just a macro lens around a T-11?

We're probably going to shoot the shot in reverse (starting in the ECU of the eye), since focus will be so critical that close. Again, any advice at all from anyone that's tried something similar would be great. Thanks!

Bobby Shore
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 03:14 AM

hey,

I have a project where the director i wants a subject to walk from a wide shot (probably starting from about 20 feet away), into an ECU of the subject's eye. we'll be shooting on a soundstage with the RED MX, so shooting at a deep stop is definitely doable. I was thinking about using the clairmont swing/tilt macro lens system, does anyone have experience with it? Or do you think a I could achieve the shot with just a macro lens around a T-11?

We're probably going to shoot the shot in reverse (starting in the ECU of the eye), since focus will be so critical that close. Again, any advice at all from anyone that's tried something similar would be great. Thanks!

Bobby Shore
DP
mtl/la
bobbyshore.com


Shootin it in reverse is definitely the way to go. I can tell you now that doing it in one take is not realistic. Even at a good stop, plan for plenty of rehearsal and marking time and a half dozen takes to get a good one with no or minimal buzzes.
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#3 Chris Millar

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:08 AM

(Coming from stills) I'd be wondering how are you going to account for any extension you use on a macro lens ?

If you use a bellows you'll have extension factors to deal with meaning you'll have to open up that T-11 as you focus closer (or stop down as you pull out in reverse)

Will you be physically be able to get the glass both far enough away from the film plane for the ECU and then be able to get the 20' focus ?
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#4 Jaron Berman

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 09:23 PM

Out of curiosity, why red mx? Is that the camera the stage owns? It seems to me that this shot could be done without any thought or preparation whatsoever on a generic HD ENG zoom lens by any relatively decent operator. Being on a stage, there's no real disadvantage to HD anyways - you have full control over your contrast range. Basically - why fight the shallow DOF of the RED when literally ANY cheap "kit" HD lens on a 2/3" camera can focus on its own front element? If the entire rest of the project is on RED, then yeah you're stuck... But it doesn't sound like a particularly difficult shot at all.

Try making a "soft stop" for your actor - like a padded frame he/she will rest his/her forehead and chin on in the end ECU frame (not attached to the camera, but still rigid). That way, you know that every single take your actor will end in the exact same spot, and you don't have to shoot it backwards - the actor will probably have a better performance forward. Kinda like a scaled-up version of what macro guys used to use for underwater photos. As for pulling focus - get a good ac and you'll be fine. Or get a good ac, lay a tape on the floor and have you 2nd call out distances... or get a cinetape. I've seen your work - you're very talented. Unless I'm missing something, this seems like it should be very simple for you to shoot? without any crazy lensing or tricks...basically a huge focus pull. Use diopters if necessary.
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