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Final Cut Pro - a good choice?


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#1 Kaido Veermae

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 04:07 AM

Hi all,

Has any of you ever used Final Cut Pro? I have seen a lot of good feedback about it and therefore I am considering it as a software for my video production studio.

Can you please tell me is it a good choice in your opinion?



Thanks and best regards,
Rudolf Konimois Film
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#2 Stuart Page

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 04:16 AM

Personally I love it. I have used FCP since V1.0, I have had most problems that you could ever have, and solved them myself, or from discussion groups on the net. It is very intuitive, and comes with a bunch of other great programmes to help with audio, compression, DVD production, etc etc. I believe that the new Premiere Pro is worth a look at, I used to use Premiere way back before Final Cut Pro, but since then I didn't look at it again. AVID is the other big player, but typically it used to cost a lot as it was hardware-based, now I believe you can run it on a Mac or PC as software app. So there are choices, but I love FCP. I also use PhotoShop and After Effects a lot in conjunction with FCP.
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 07:44 AM

It's not my area, but AVID seem to have made improvements in their current software for the newer codecs whilst FCP seems to be lagging a bit in this regard.
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#4 David Desio

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 08:53 AM

I use both FCP and Premier Pro CS4.

I like FCP because I can really beat it up, but it lacks in compatibility with any CS4 software such as after effects. Invest in a program called AUTO-DUCK because if you want to work back and forth, you need to render out of one, then import into the other which can get frustrating when little mistakes start happening such as animations being a few frames off and what-not. Also I use P2 cards alot and FCP can't take the footage directly like Premier can. For FCP you need to import the footage which FCP has to convert to a usable codec which takes time, with premier I can drag and drop the P2 files and they instantly appear as workable clips. Then when I'm ready to go to AE from premier it's as simple as cutting and pasting, no render needed to go back and forth. What you change in AE automatically updates in Premier's timelines.

The reason I use FCP for important jobs is because it seems more robust, less buggy and crashy than premier. The navigation of FCP uses different keystrokes than the CS suite, which can be a little annoying, but that's minor. What I do love about Premier is that you don't need to go into your finder (Mac) to get files, the finder has a tab built into the program itself which is convenient.

I have not used the new CS5 version of premier nor the new final cut studio so I'm not sure how those compare...

Don't know much about Avid...

Overall I'd stay with FCP despite the annoyances because it would be hard to explain to a client that their project is delayed because my editing software crashed...again.
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#5 Benjamin Rowland

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 09:08 AM

I use FCP and the programs that come with it for the entire post production workflow of a national show. It has worked really well. Avid and Premiere can edit a lot of the new camera codecs without transcoding. I imagine Apple will add native editing to the next major upgrade of FCP, but they're not saying when. People are successfully editing projects with all three. They each have their pros and cons. You really couldn't go wrong with any of them. I'd suggest trying them out and see what you like. Avid and Adobe offer demo versions.

If you see yourself collaborating with people on the post-production side, then you would benefit from using the same software that they are.

With all of the advancements made in editing software over the past decade, it's more about the person using the software than the brand of software.
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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 10:29 AM

Coming from a film editing background, I just learned to use FCP last year. For digital, it's a good program. Very intuitive for anyone who has done any kind of editing in the past.

I never did much work on any other digital system so I don't have much to compare it with. But most people swear by it. Just make sure your CPU has a LOT of RAM for the program, otherwise it will take forever to render and it will eventually crash. The suite comes with a number of other programs (Compressor, Color, Soundtrack Pro, etc.) so you wind up getting more bang for your buck.

Edited by Bill DiPietra, 03 September 2010 - 10:30 AM.

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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 01:45 PM

We've had a couple shows on FCP, "Everybody Hates Chris", and "NCIS/LA". Everything else is Avid.

They both get the job done. The deciding factors for us are what the editors prefer, and what the post facilities find convenient.

It sounds like you'll be learning and using this system yourself, so an editor preference doesn't yet exist. By far the biggest investment is your effort in learning an editing system. So, where do you want to be five years from now? What do you want to be editing then? Go with whatever is the majority system in that part of the industry. For us, overwhelmingly, it's Avid.




-- J.S.
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#8 Dustan Lewis McBain

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 02:40 PM

I just recently read an article on how Adobe's newest software blows FCP/studio out of the water. But im assuming that it was adobe who wrote the article in the Magazine. I would say if you can. and its not hard to find, get both fcp and premiere. Because if you'd like to go through after affects, or photoshop you can do it that easily with adobe. Clients always like to work with people who have the most to offer. They want someone who is very savvy in different aspect and can offer different ways of completing the project. And also the fact that when you have both you'll have the freedom to mess around with both worlds.

(never used avid so couldnt add that aspect to my reply)

Hope that helps,
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#9 Karel Bata

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Posted 05 September 2010 - 05:21 AM

Didn't somebody post a link to a side-by-side 'shoot out' here a while ago where they demonstrated that CS5 beats FCP pants down?
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