Jump to content


Photo

BBC is switching to Premiere Pro CS5


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Frank Glencairn

Frank Glencairn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 138 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Germany

Posted 09 September 2010 - 08:03 AM

This is huge - BBC is known as rather conservative.

The BBC is switching to Premiere Pro CS5 software, through which the corporation is improving workflow efficiency, creating a tapeless environment and reducing costs. The corporation is now implementing an additional 2,000 seats of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 software as the company’s primary tool for desktop nonlinear editing. The broadcaster’s expanded use of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 software highlights the growing momentum for Adobe Creative Suite 5 Production Premium across the broadcast industry.


http://frankglencair...emiere-pro-cs5/

Frank
  • 0

#2 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11936 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 September 2010 - 08:27 AM

Premiere has always been a somewhat more flexible editor than Final Cut, but you had to be more of a computer person to understand why. FCP was always mroe like Avid, which was always going to make it "better" in the eyes of the old guard. I've never held this view and always thought the Adobe offering was more useful. Nice to know I'm no longer as entirely alone in this view as I once was!

P
  • 0

#3 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 09 September 2010 - 09:21 AM

Yeah but since Premiere runs on a PC won't the system be crashing every five minutes and need a tech to come and remove the viruses?

Also, the hamsters that power PCs by running in those little wheels will need replacing on a regular basis, this will cost the BBC a fortune.

The good news for the BBC is that PCs have great potential as re-sale items in the boat anchor market.

R,
  • 0

#4 Frank Glencairn

Frank Glencairn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 138 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Germany

Posted 09 September 2010 - 10:31 AM

Umhh... Premiere runs on PC and MAC. Basically both use the same hardware from the same manufacturers (Intel, Nvidia etc.) only difference is the OS which plays no role at all, when you working in the application.

You won´t find a virus on a editing workstation anyway, unless you are stupid enough to connect a computer, which makes your living as an editor and has customer data on it to the Internet. Professionals have dedicated computers just for surfing the net.

If you want to learn about computer crashes, look in every FCP or MAC forum and count the threads.

best, Frank

Edited by Frank Glencairn, 09 September 2010 - 10:36 AM.

  • 0

#5 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 09 September 2010 - 10:49 AM

Last I heard they are not making Premiere for Mac any more, not to run natively any way.

I was counting the number of posts on the Adobe site regarding crashes on PCs using Premiere, but I lost count after 10, 519 then fell asleep :D

Beyond me how any one would actually choose to not use a Mac?

R,
  • 0

#6 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7116 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:14 PM

I know for a face Premier CS4 runs on Mac, and I don't see a reason why they'd've changed that with CS5.
  • 0

#7 Brian Rose

Brian Rose
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 896 posts
  • Student
  • Kansas City area

Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:20 PM

I think Frank made an excellent point, that a major weakness for Premiere is internet connectivity. It is an open door, and I agree that any pro will have a separate system. It's what I do. I just upgraded to a new multi-core system, and it will never be connected to the internet. Instead, I use my prior editing system, which is more than adequate for all my other needs, to surf the net and all of that. With portable hard drives and the high speed of data transfer, it is a small matter to transfer files from one to the other if I need to upload to the net. The minor inconvenience is more than made up in not having to worry about my new system being corrupted.

I've had great success with Premiere. I also love using Final Cut. They are both useful for different applications, and I feel that I am a stronger editor by being able to move fluently from one system to another. Editing programs are like languages I think...no one language is better than another, but each is appropriate for different circumstances.

I often have wondered if people cling slavishly to one system or another simply because they fear trying something different, or are afraid of discovering they've put a lot of money into a system and software which is inferior. I certainly am guilty of this, having cut my teeth on Premiere, and having been told for so long that Final Cut is the standard and the best, and I admit avoiding it because I was afraid I'd discover I'd been spinning my wheels on a second rate program. Eventually I overcame such stubborn pride, and learned Final Cut. I still use Premiere, but now it is a decision based on informed experience rather than ignorance.

BR
  • 0

#8 Karel Bata

Karel Bata
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts
  • Director
  • London - a rather posh bit

Posted 09 September 2010 - 12:52 PM

I've got CS5 on my Mac. No sign here of any lack of support. And why should they when both platforms now use the i7?
  • 0

#9 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 09 September 2010 - 01:19 PM

Actually Premiere does do some things better than FCP, as I was a long time Premiere user before switching to FCP.

I did find that every post house works with FCP and people will often say, "can I get your FCP project file." I've never been asked for a Premiere project file.

If only Premiere and FCP can marry, and produce a child with the best qualities of both parents.

R,
  • 0

#10 Karel Bata

Karel Bata
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts
  • Director
  • London - a rather posh bit

Posted 09 September 2010 - 02:43 PM

There's a lot of things CS5 as a suite does better. Check out On Location and Story - which allows multiple users to collaborate. That was Avid's strong point a few years ago with the NewsCutter. My guess is that this is what's of real interest to the BBC. I bet they've been developing software with Adobe.

The Apple stuff is excellent, but not as strong on remote collaboration as CS5.

Edited by Karel Bata, 09 September 2010 - 02:47 PM.

  • 0

#11 Frank Glencairn

Frank Glencairn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 138 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Germany

Posted 09 September 2010 - 05:20 PM

If only Premiere and FCP can marry, and produce a child with the best qualities of both parents.


LOL! Yeah, that would be nice. But since Premiere can read and write FCP files (via XML) they can at least sleep with another. B)

Frank
  • 0

#12 Dave Blackham

Dave Blackham

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 09 January 2011 - 09:55 AM

I think Frank made an excellent point, that a major weakness for Premiere is internet connectivity. It is an open door, and I agree that any pro will have a separate system.


I don't agree, the major plus point of a networked system is they do have internet connectivity. I've run post houses large and small and whilst you have to police internet connectivity via Firewalls and so on its really not really so much of an issue for mac and linux based operations. Where it can be an issue is via Windows based operations where the potential for problems from malwear is much greater.

Premiere on Mac is a good move premiere on PC much less so, Apple strength lies in its ability to innovate and in recent years has created excellent and affordable hardware with a very solid OS. I think the point thats being missed is QT workflow has been the secret of successes here on Apple platforms, not so much FCP or any other app. If the media can be exchanged between vendors apps so much more becomes possible.

Dave Blackham
  • 0

#13 Paco Sweetman

Paco Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK

Posted 09 January 2011 - 01:03 PM

I learned how to edit using NLE's with Premiere. Then moved to Avid. I now use FCP which I love.

If it was a choice between going back to Premiere I would rather use a Steenbeck.
  • 0

#14 Marcus Joseph

Marcus Joseph
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney, Australia

Posted 09 January 2011 - 08:20 PM

I think the most significant factor in switching to Premiere would be the 64 bit system and Mercury Playback Engine, which is incredibly fast stuff when it comes to rendering all around. But the fact is that it is only really utilised with nvidia GPUs, which makes all of the Mac ATI preconfigurations pointless. Only way is to get a Mac Pro (ridiculously over pried in comparison to any self made PC around/most PC manufacturers) and change the card out (as well as up every other piece of hardware too).

And CS5 works swell with Mac systems, 32 and 64 bit. I occasionally use it on my iMac for editing, very fast, but could be faster if Apple used Nvidia. Besides my everyday Final Cut, I would certainly consider moving to Premiere if Apple don't step up their game.
  • 0

#15 Joseph Arch

Joseph Arch
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Director

Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:25 PM

Marcus got it right. BBC tested both systems with multiple video files to see which could handle things faster and premier won because of Nvidea's dedicated GPU and 64 bit.

Also, they have made the switch because of After Effects and Photpshop. It's easy to switch between programmes rather then export and import files.


Their PC's don't need to be connected to the internet and they won't have virus problems. Simples.
  • 0

#16 John Young

John Young
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Other
  • Lexington, KY

Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:48 PM

I've tried all three (Avid, FCP and Primere CS5). I understand that the reason Avid uses the types of icons and nomenclature they do, but I find that Premiere is more straightforward. Maybe because I AM a computer user I find it easier to use than either Avid OR Final Cut. Now, on the other hand, I do not like the fact that, depending on the capture format, Premiere is a little less edit playback friendly.
  • 0

#17 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5069 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 10 January 2011 - 12:13 PM

Their PC's don't need to be connected to the internet and they won't have virus problems. Simples.


I believe the BBC runs an Intranet, so they'll be using their own system. The BBC also has a lot of PCs.

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 10 January 2011 - 12:14 PM.

  • 0

#18 Joseph Arch

Joseph Arch
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • Director

Posted 10 January 2011 - 02:39 PM

I would be worried if they did not have an Intranet.
  • 0


Tai Audio

CineLab

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Visual Products

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products