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Developing Ektachrome 100d


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#1 Miles Jordan

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 02:10 PM

Hey. I'm new to this whole film thing and I was wondering if you have to develop Ektachrome 100d film. If so, can someone explain the reason? Can I not just put it on a projector to watch it? Thanks.
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 02:31 PM

Sure you have to develop it. If you were to shoot the film and then try to immediately project it you would ruin everything you had shot because film is light-, heat-, and radiation sensitive until the time of processing. There is only a latent image on film after you shoot it (You could only see this with special equipment under a microscope; to the naked eye a latent image on film looks no different than unexposed film) This needs to be chemically REDUCED by a developer to form a silver image and then a color image. This applies to just about all types of photographic film and paper that I know of. There are only a few types of plate-making films for offset printing that can be handled in subdued roomlight.


As for it being Ektachrome, that means that it is process E-6, not ECN-2 (movie color negative) or C-41 (still color negative). E-6 processing produces an image B&W high-contrast negative. This black, metallic silver image is then bleached out, and the remaining unexposed silver (think a negative of a negative) is then developed in a second color developer to produce a projection-contrast image on the film.


It is best to have a proper film lab that specializes in E-6 do the processing. Be aware that there are only a few that offer E-6 processing. I've used Pac Labs in New York for Reversal work (although it was with VNF-1 the predecessor to the E-6 process in motion picture work) with good results.
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#3 Miles Jordan

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 02:45 PM

Is there any way that it can be developed at home? Thanks, by the way, for the reply.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 02:58 PM

No problem Miles.


While you can self-develop E100D, I wouldn't recomend it. I assume you're using either S8 or 16mm. You'd have to buy an expensive processing tank (I would only recommend a special Russian spiral reel for this application) and E6 kit which would cost quite a bit more than the use you'd get out of them.

E-6 is a complicated process, and is temperature critical unless you don't mind color shifts and contrast shifts.

Are you located in the U.S. or elsewhere? I'll see if I can look you up a closer lab if you tell me your location. . .
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#5 Miles Jordan

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:07 PM

I see what you are saying. A person that is just starting out probably should not jump in to some thing tha is too risky. When you send the film off to a lab, do the return it to you in its cartridge? I am using super 8 and I have a canon 1014. I have a Kodak Supermatic 70 Super-8 Sound Projector. Thanks.
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#6 Miles Jordan

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:21 PM

Memphis,TN
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 04:06 PM

http://www.littlefil...html#Ektachrome


Here is a list. I'm not sure if it is current, so you may want to call around. Pac Labs actually might be one of the closest to you, or the one in Allentown.
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#8 Miles Jordan

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 05:59 PM

Thank you very, very much Karl.
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#9 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 12:02 AM

When the film is developed, is it returned in its cartridge, or do they return it in a spool?
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#10 Nicholas Rapak

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 01:07 PM

When the film is developed, is it returned in its cartridge, or do they return it in a spool?


They return it on a 50' spool with leader attached.
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#11 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:11 PM

How will that work if the projector I have takes the cartridge?
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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:32 PM

I don't think I've ever heard of a projector which takes a cartridge. . . do you happen to know the make/model of it?
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#13 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:56 PM

I'm sorry. I'm just starting out and I may be wrong, but I thought that the Kodak Supermatic 70 Super-8 Sound Projector just took a cartridge. I ordered all of this stuff off of ebay. It hasn't all come in yet. I ordered a canon 1014, that projector, and some Ektachrome 100D. So far only the film has arrived. Please don't hesitate to correct me. I need help with this! (Thanks so far!)
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#14 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:04 PM

No worries at all, hell we were all "there" before, overwhelmed etc. It certainly looks to me like the '70 projector is your typical reel to reel type, so you're load your developed reversal on one end, and feed it through to the other, and it'll project. Just, word of advice, don't run negative film through the thing, just reversal.
Also, speak with your lab, they often can give you back S8mm transferred to digital formats, up to and including some which offer 1080p Pro Res Files, pretty high resolution, which you can easily work with in an NLE, and above all, have fun shooting the film. It's a bit expensive, yes, but nothing is more rewarding than getting some good shots.
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#15 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:36 PM

Well that's good news! Thank you for being so understanding. The reason that I thought that the projector took a cartridge is because I saw a video on youtube that explained double system editing and it showed someone putting a cartridge in a projctor. Here is the link.




Thanks
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#16 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:44 PM

Well that's good news! Thank you for being so understanding. The reason that I thought that the projector took a cartridge is because I saw a video on youtube that explained double system editing and it showed someone putting a cartridge in a projctor. Here is the link.




Thanks



The projector in the video is the one that I ordered. Skip to 2:18
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#17 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:47 PM

Wow miles, looks like you're right, that's pretty wild. I've never seen a cart projector before. In any case, you can theoretically, load your own carts should you need to, but most projectors I've seen are your typical reel to reel ones. Should you need to load carts, it's not too difficult of a proposition, a kin to loading a co-axial film mag (very easy), but let's wait and see what your projector is like first.
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#18 Miles Jordan

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:54 PM

Wow miles, looks like you're right, that's pretty wild. I've never seen a cart projector before. In any case, you can theoretically, load your own carts should you need to, but most projectors I've seen are your typical reel to reel ones. Should you need to load carts, it's not too difficult of a proposition, a kin to loading a co-axial film mag (very easy), but let's wait and see what your projector is like first.


Here is some more info:

http://www.super8dat...ctors_kodak.htm

I hope I didn't order the wrong thing!
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