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Upside down skydiving footage


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#1 Dex Mar

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Posted 13 September 2010 - 03:16 PM

I was hoping some helpful people could look over some skydive footage a friend and I filmed this weekend. The strange thing about this footage is that it was filmed upside down. The reason for this, is that we were practicing a discipline of skydiving called "head-down freeflying". Basically, we skydive like we are standing on our heads to go faster than the 120mph terminal velocity normally associated with skydiving.

Initially, I posted the footage to YouTube in its original orientation. I've gotten very used to seeing the world upside down, so I thought nothing of the strange perspective. I then began wondering if viewers, who were not accustomed to the perspective, would find the video confusing as it appears we are traveling upward, so I created a separate video where the footage has been rotated 180 degrees, to present a more realistic orientation and direction.

My question is, which video orientation would yield the best viewing experience?

I posted my question to a separate skydiving message board earlier, and then I thought it might also be a good idea to receive additional advice from a more technically knowledgeable resource. I figure honest opinions from a non-skydiver, cinematographer perspective would allow me to make good decisions in the future about how I present my footage to all viewers.

Here are the links to the videos (they are also available up to 1080p):

Original:
Flipped:

Also, the flipped version looks odd at the start, so I'm wondering if I should keep it right side up until we leave the plane. I wasn't sure what kind of video transition would work best: some sort of zoom and rotate, or just having the video flip instantly, etc.

I'm open to any kind of suggestions or analysis. Thanks in advance.

Edited by Dexter Marcelino, 13 September 2010 - 03:19 PM.

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#2 Damien Andre

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 10:17 PM

I personally like the original orientation, its interesting having the divers right-side up. It depends what you want the viewer to feel watching it, decide if you want the whole world upside down with your divers unaffected right-side up or the whole world grounded with the divers falling. whatever you prefer really, i dont think either way is confusing.
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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 01:25 AM

At first I was going to say the original works fine but honestly after seeing the flipped version, it works better, far less disorienting to an audience. Now IF you wanted to set the audience on edge or something like that, I might consider the original, BUT if you want them to feel the pure joy and exhilaration of skydiving, the flipped version is far less distracting. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 15 September 2010 - 01:26 AM.

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#4 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 07:46 AM

Definitely the flipped one seems better to me.
All the people upside-down start to make sense. And you see all the speed, correct orientation etc.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 08:29 AM

And to think I may soon have to work out some sort of approach to simulating someone BASE jumping off a building.

Aaargh. Green screen hell be mine.

P
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