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how to expose on 16mm for fire and explosions?


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#1 Nadia Bairamis

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 12:02 PM

Im shooting a student film, in the comming week, and i was wondering if any one had advice on how to expose for fire and expolsions, in both day and night situations.
In the day, we are shooting a car explosion, and in the evening a 10 story building interior and exterior, on fire.

Edited by Nadia Bairamis, 20 September 2010 - 12:03 PM.

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#2 Dustan Lewis McBain

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 11:34 PM

In my experience, for the day, expose normally, make sure that you keep your characters and sky to a more normal perspective (depending on your vision) and let the fire go, keeping importance on your characters. However, depending on your day your fire shouldnt be blowing out in contrast to everything else. Night time, expose your fire, then light up your chrachter's to what you light with sources. Or if you going for a natural perspective, shoot at high stock and have your as as comfortably close to the fire as possible, lol. Your 10 store building might be hard to act as a key light for your actors, so be creative!
Im curious, how are you going to explode a 10 floor building?
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#3 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 09:38 PM

In my experience, for the day, expose normally, make sure that you keep your characters and sky to a more normal perspective (depending on your vision) and let the fire go, keeping importance on your characters. However, depending on your day your fire shouldnt be blowing out in contrast to everything else. Night time, expose your fire, then light up your chrachter's to what you light with sources. Or if you going for a natural perspective, shoot at high stock and have your as as comfortably close to the fire as possible, lol. Your 10 store building might be hard to act as a key light for your actors, so be creative!
Im curious, how are you going to explode a 10 floor building?

I was wondering the same thing about the explosion. As a news cameraman, I've probably shot a couple of hundred fires, both day and night. The natural light from the fire at night is a great idea. I've gotten away without having to resort to the on camera batt light for talent with a small, handheld reflector bouncing off of the flames. If you catch it just right, the fire's movement makes for some interesting reflections in the talent's eyes. It can also make for a natural back light.
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Visual Products

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Tai Audio

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Willys Widgets

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