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Stock for Night


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#1 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 11:03 AM

It's two locations that take place in the night. One is a street chase (ex. dark knight look) , the other is a junk yard.

It is being shot on 35mm. Would a 5219 Kodak Vision 3 500T be good/ with an 85 on it?
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#2 John Holland

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 11:11 AM

Why would you want to use a 85 filter ???
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#3 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 11:48 AM

Why would you want to use a 85 filter ???


Make it daylight balance?

Idk, or do you recommend a Daylight balance film?
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 12:05 PM

Make it daylight balance?

Idk, or do you recommend a Daylight balance film?


Why do you need a daylight balance film stock? Do you want to colour correct for HMI's? These are usually kept blue for night sequences shot with tungsten stocks. A point to remember is that most street lights use sodium lights, which are yellow.

You can colour correct the tungsten stock when shooting in daylight without an 85, if it's an issue.
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 12:11 PM

'19 is a nice wide stock with a lot of range on it, and as mentioned, normally shot w/o a filter for night scenes, else things like car headlights, or work lights etc will render orange. For HMIs, or other Daylight heads you might be using (kino flo, lite panels etc) it is normally better/easier and more precise to gel them individually, especially for HMIs whose color temperature change over the life of the bulb. Normally we'll color meter each HMI at the beginning of the shoot and work out which gelpack to use to correct them to 5600K for good matching. Often, depending on the duration of the shoot, I'll have them rechecked.
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#6 devoria

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 08:49 AM

It's two locations that take place in the night. One is a street chase (ex. dark knight look) , the other is a junk yard.

It is being shot on 35mm. Would a 5219 Kodak Vision 3 500T be good/ with an 85 on it?



where is the shots?
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#7 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 01:01 PM

where is the shots?


Here's the bus place, I have already scouted the area and it looks great.
Posted Image

You can view the rest here my dudes.

http://www.facebook....87&id=645119497
Posted Image
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#8 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 01:03 PM

Here's quick draft that summarizes story. There's a lot more by the way...


Edited by Geovane Marquez, 30 September 2010 - 01:05 PM.

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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 09:24 AM

I would *not* recommend Kodak 5005 stock (Ektachrome something-or-other) for a stock! :-p


What John H. is getting at is that, unless you are doing time-lapse by the light of the moon, there is no "daylight" at night. It's the night-time!


'19 (or Fuji equivalent) would probably be best, although you can use a 200T stock as well. I wouldn't go below that speed. They managed to do it with 100T stock back in the day, but even then that was often pushed to 200T, and there was 50T pushed to 100T before that.

I tend to shoot the slowest speed film the situation will allow, but in night-for-night photography, the high speed films really do make the most sense. Grain isn't as much of a problem, too when they are printed dense to appear dark as the human eye interprets night. Of course, there are a lot of "conventions" with night-time photography. If you wanted to be ultra-ultra realistic, the human eye can only see black-and-white (rods in the eye are more sensitive than color-seeing cones) in dim light, so the only "color" you see at night will be the Moon, and the artificial lights themselves. Illumination rapidly falls off. The convention though, is to portray moonlight as a shade of blue, which isn't the way the eye really sees it. Hence shooting uncorrected is OK. Color balance, in general, is flexible with night scenes, because as they are printed dark, the color shifts are more subtle. I'd say the only thing that wouldn't be "accepted" by the viewer would be a WARM balance.
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#10 Ben Brahem Ziryab

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:34 AM

Shoot tungsten balanced stock. Use HMI to simulate the moon or 1K lights with CTO for streetlight. Moonlighting gives a slight blue color temperature, but because of the tungsten balanced stock, it should match alright. And use a color meter, to check the bulb temperature of your HMI.
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