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Correct exposure for 64T&100D + Vision 3 200T&500T


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#1 Micbress

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 04:45 PM

Reading the forum i've seen several topics with these questions so i've thought to fuse all into this, considering that i also need some advices..

I will start posting what i know and i've learned here, so i will ask you to correct me if i do mistake

I've calculated everything considering my camera, Nizo Pro, only 100 and 160 ASA reading.


KODAK Vision 3 200T


Will be read at 160ASA on the bulb setting. Still 1/3 overexposed but will be ok for the negative, nicer grain, more density.

But if shooting outdoor, lets say in a sunny day, we must put on an external 85B filter because the Vision in tungsten balanced. In this case we have a drop of -2/3 from the filter and a exposure value almost correct; here we can compensate a little overexposing to make popup the colours.

Can we set the film on daylight filter to have it at 100ASA (+2 overexposed) and just put on the external 85B to have a cut of 2/3 and still have it overexposed?


KODAK Vision 3 500T


If set the camera filter on bulb and have -1 stop from that value we have the film at 320ASA, still 2/3 overexposed, nice for granulation.

For use it outdoor we must add the 85B filter and we will have (probably) a right exposure with correct tones (85B), because the lightmeter will compensate what the 85B has eat.

Other suggestions? What about shooting indoors with natural light, no tungsten? What will be the best solution for the Vision films? in poor light condition we must use the 85B to avoid cold tones, even if there isnt a tungsten source?

KODAK 100D


Daylight reversal film that can be used on daylight filter, this way will have it at 100ASA.

In Daylight conditions with the internal filter on, we can add an ND2-4 filter for have it a bit underexposed, better for reversal.

What about the use of this stock for interior shooting? Just manually overexposing by opening the iris or set the film on bulb to have it read at 160ASA?

KODAK 64T

64ASA tungsten film that the Nizo pro read at 100ASA on daylight filter. for outdoor shooting let the daylight filter on an add an external 85B for color correction and for the -2/3 exposure.

At this point, whit the 85B on and -2/3 exposure, if will be ok to underexpose another 1/3?


hope that the topic and all the possible answers will help

thx
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#2 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 05:53 PM

When your adding an external filter, you are placing it in front of the light meter... so your reading is already compensating for the light subtracted by the filter. If you are shooting 100D, you will set the filter switch on daylight for a true 100ASA reading (I would test the accuracy of normal exposure before making any adjustments with going under 1/3rd) Since 100D is pretty fast in sunlight, an ND filter comes in handy to prevent your exposure from going over the scale. A 0.3 ND cuts 1 stop, a 0.6 cuts 2 stops.
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#3 Jim Carlile

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 01:48 AM

But if you're putting an external 85 over the lens, and then you slide the filter switch to 'daylight,' aren't you then putting another 85 in the light path, internally? That makes two 85s, right? (this is for tungsten film as set to daylight. 100D in most cameras will have disabled the internal filter.}

In most S8 cameras, the 'daylight' setting is only for using tungsten film with the internal 85 correction filter. 'Bulb' means no internal filter is in place.

Also, in the regular notched cartridge for tungsten film, when you slide the filter switch to daylight, the camera is still metering it at ASA 160. All that's happening is that the internal 85 filter goes into place with a 2/3-stop factor, which means the film then has an effective sensitivity of 100.

You're not really metering it at 100, so you're not going to get that 1-stop overexposure problem-- so you don't need an ND to correct for it. It will only be 1/3 stop-- ASA 200 minus ASA 160 is about a 1/3 stop difference.

On 100D, you don't need the 85 filter, which the film cartridge has already disabled anyway. In fact, you never need it-- it will ruin the shot.

Here's my general understanding of these films-- as applied to the silver Nizos only.

---100D will be automatically read at ASA 100 if the filter switch is set to 'daylight' and not bulb. The 85 filter is automatically disengaged either way.

200T-- the new V3 cartridge-- is notched, so it is read as ASA 160 when the filter switch is set to bulb. If set to 'daylight', the internal 85 is slid into place and the meter automatically corrects for the 2/3 stop filter factor, which gives an effective ASA usage of 100. It's 1/3 stop overexposed.

500T- the new V3 cartridge-- is notched also, so it is metered at ASA 160 on those Nizos as well, because they will not read above ASA 160. This means that without manual override the higher speed 500T VISION stock will be way too overexposed.

The older V2 films are notchless-- and so have a one-stop overexposure built right into them (according to the SMPTE method), along with a disabled internal 85 filter. Daylight correction must be supplied by an external 85. The Nizos can override this by sliding the filter switch to 'bulb,' where the meter will then be set to ASA 160 but without the internal filter, which has been disengaged by the notchless cartridge. But you still need an external 85 if you want daylight correction.

Correct?

On most other cameras, you have no choice in the matter when using daylight 'notchless' cartridges. They will either not be noticed at all (as in the newer 'G' cameras that were designed to ignore the SMPTE method), or they will stick to the lower ASA setting of the daylight speed indice. You can't toggle back and forth to the higher one.

On the silver Nizos you apparently can, but a notchless cartridge will still disable the internal 85 filter, even if it doesn't lock in the lower 'daylight' ASA.

Edited by Jim Carlile, 24 September 2010 - 01:53 AM.

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