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SONY training worth the money?


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#1 George Ebersole

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 08:49 AM

Once I get my other obligations settled I'd like to enroll in SONY's training program for their digital cameras.

Is it worth the money? Or should I hire myself out for free to a DP who can train me?
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:46 AM

In theory you should learn a lot quicker and more depth attending a course. With a DP you may be limited by their knowledge level and any bad habits they've picked up, plus they may not have the time to go into detail on an actual job.
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 12:49 PM

How much do you already know? One way it might not be worth doing is if it's too basic for you.



-- J.S.
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#4 George Ebersole

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 12:55 PM

Yeah, that's the whole thing. I can change lenses, air out the gate, thread it, but beyond that (and pushing a dolly, which isn't even camera related as such) I'm a novice.

Edit; DOH! And those are film camera skills, not digital.
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#5 George Ebersole

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:45 PM

How much do you already know? One way it might not be worth doing is if it's too basic for you.



-- J.S.

The truth is I just don't know. I'm just so damn rusty. I haven't shot anything in ages, and then it was always for somebody else.
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#6 Thomas James

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:11 AM

I thought Red One was the camera system to work on. The Sony F23 is nice but more expensive
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:15 AM

I thought Red One was the camera system to work on. The Sony F23 is nice but more expensive


Not every production shoots with a RED One, some productions prefer the tape work flow rather than RAW.
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#8 Thomas James

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:31 AM

Television productions may use a tape based work flow but I think other than using film Red One has the advantage for a feature film.
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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 02:31 PM

Television productions may use a tape based work flow but I think other than using film Red One has the advantage for a feature film.


I don't think it was stated if he was shooting feature films, just learning about Sony cameras.
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#10 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 03:26 PM

Out of curiosity, what's the cost?
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#11 George Ebersole

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 04:26 PM

Out of curiosity, what's the cost?

I wish I could remember, but something like $3,500 or something? Their course catalog and phone numbers are both down right now.
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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 04:33 PM

Ahh, yeah for that much vet it out. If it was just a few bucks, or a few hundred, I'd say do it, but not for $3500.
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#13 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 05:40 PM

I'd check out the Maine Workshops or the Santa Fe HD workshops, their workshops are much less expensive ($1200-$1500)and would cover most day to day requirements.
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#14 Karel Bata

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:39 PM

Or learn about 3D - for free!!

"Schklair suggested attending the week long Sony 3-D Workshops at the Sony Pictures Entertainment lot in Culver City, CA. It’s free to anyone with minimal production qualifications and is based on materials developed by 3Ality and its staff."
http://blog.broadcas...critical-level/

If I lived anywhere near I'd be in there like a shot!
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#15 George Ebersole

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 09:17 PM

Or learn about 3D - for free!!

"Schklair suggested attending the week long Sony 3-D Workshops at the Sony Pictures Entertainment lot in Culver City, CA. It’s free to anyone with minimal production qualifications and is based on materials developed by 3Ality and its staff."
http://blog.broadcas...critical-level/

If I lived anywhere near I'd be in there like a shot!

What are "minimal production qualifications"? I know what a c-stand is, I've done all kinds of support jobs... how do you qualify?
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#16 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 02:22 AM

Alternatively, you could buy one of Paul Wheeler's books (eg High Definition Cinematography) and go down to the rental house and work through the chapters on their cameras. However, I don't think there's much detail on the latest Sony F23 & F35 cameras other than introducing them.
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#17 George Ebersole

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 04:45 AM

Alternatively, you could buy one of Paul Wheeler's books (eg High Definition Cinematography) and go down to the rental house and work through the chapters on their cameras. However, I don't think there's much detail on the latest Sony F23 & F35 cameras other than introducing them.

I actually read his books. The advice there is a little iffy to me. Reading his material it sounds like if you have the money, rent a package and play with it to get the most of the equipment. I was expecting something a bit more technical minded.
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#18 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 05:41 AM

I actually read his books. The advice there is a little iffy to me. Reading his material it sounds like if you have the money, rent a package and play with it to get the most of the equipment. I was expecting something a bit more technical minded.


Most rental companies will allow you to practise with the kit on their premises.

He's more getting your feet wet and aimed at DPs starting HD rather than any great depth, if you want more you need to do one of the workshops. It really depends how deep you want to go.
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#19 Hal Smith

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 07:54 AM

How much do you know about digital cameras now? If you're totally unfamiliar with them you could buy an inexpensive older miniDV camera (preferably with manual control options) and go out and shoot a bunch of tape for experience. I learned a lot about digital cameras with a little Sony TRV-30, a pile of tapes, and shooting stage productions I was lighting.

First lesson after being a film geek for years was just how easy it was to blow out a video picture. :blink:
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