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#1 George Ebersole

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 01:23 PM

Are Canon's EOS series that good for shooting prosumer video?

I guess my real question is are they better for still photography, or is a lens for a still camera just as good or the same as a lens specifically designed for a video/film camera?

Sorry for the dumb question, but I'd really like to know.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 01:51 PM

Optically they are fine, the biggest issues are mechanical, dealing with barrel rotation, and by that I mean a small move on the barrel is a huge change in focus, -v- cine lenses which have a longer throw. The other mechanical problem is markings and how "true" they are, how many they are. Aside from that their design can induce breathing, or other strange focus effects as it moves through it's "move." None of this is insurmountable, and a good AC, given some time with the lenses, should be able to overcome it. I'd also recommend shooting at a deeper stop than is "typical," by that I mean a 4 or a 5.6. It seems a lot of people like to be WFO which makes focusing problematic on any lens.
There are also some issues with color matching, sometimes, but nothing that cannot be rectified in a color correction program. And, in the end, whether it's "good enough," for your project is almost always an answer you need to make for yourself. It's subjective inasmuch as what is appropriate for you. I'd see if you can get some time testing them out at a dealer before investing, though.
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#3 George Ebersole

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 12:16 AM

Optically they are fine, the biggest issues are mechanical, dealing with barrel rotation, and by that I mean a small move on the barrel is a huge change in focus, -v- cine lenses which have a longer throw. The other mechanical problem is markings and how "true" they are, how many they are. Aside from that their design can induce breathing, or other strange focus effects as it moves through it's "move." None of this is insurmountable, and a good AC, given some time with the lenses, should be able to overcome it. I'd also recommend shooting at a deeper stop than is "typical," by that I mean a 4 or a 5.6. It seems a lot of people like to be WFO which makes focusing problematic on any lens.
There are also some issues with color matching, sometimes, but nothing that cannot be rectified in a color correction program. And, in the end, whether it's "good enough," for your project is almost always an answer you need to make for yourself. It's subjective inasmuch as what is appropriate for you. I'd see if you can get some time testing them out at a dealer before investing, though.

Thanks Adrian. That's the exact answer I was looking for.
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#4 Thomas James

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:14 AM

The problem with those DSLR's is that with all that line skipping it's like trying to shoot through a set of venetian blinds.
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#5 George Ebersole

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 09:19 PM

The problem with those DSLR's is that with all that line skipping it's like trying to shoot through a set of venetian blinds.

Not sure I follow "line skipping". Do you mean raster?
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 09:28 PM

In order to record their HD image without the required processing power, the Canon cameras do something interesting, they read off every OTHER line on the sensor; as opposed to the whole thing. Hence the term, line skipping.
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#7 George Ebersole

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 01:24 AM

Oh boy. You're kidding... right? No. Why is it every-time I choose a piece of relatively inexpensive sleek equipment there's always a catch.

Thanks. :rolleyes:
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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 05:48 AM

I'm not sure it's as simple as line skipping - tests with carefully-produced test charts suggest that they may be reading out rather irregular clumps of pixels, presumably in an attempt to minimise the inevitable aliasing.

The Panasonic stuff has considerably better aliasing performance than Canon. Perhaps look at a GH2.

P
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#9 Hal Smith

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:33 AM

I'm not sure it's as simple as line skipping - tests with carefully-produced test charts suggest that they may be reading out rather irregular clumps of pixels, presumably in an attempt to minimise the inevitable aliasing.

The Panasonic stuff has considerably better aliasing performance than Canon. Perhaps look at a GH2.

P


Has Alan Roberts at BBC Tech published his tests on 5D/7D's? I've heard BBC has tested them and approved them for independent productions.
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