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Modification for mallory 2.7V PX-14 batteries in Super 8


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#1 Nicole Crescenzi

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 03:44 PM

Hello,

So, I have a Bell & Howell 311 (Super 8), that needs a new battery...and the manual calls for a Mallory 2.7V PX-14...which are discontinued because of the mercury issues. I have heard that you can maybe use 2 zinc 675, 1.4 volts (hearing aid batteries) instead...but they are too small in diameter. Would forming a sort of sleeve or coozy out of aluminum foil around them work to make up for their smaller size? Or would that alter the voltage (and thus the exposure) too much?

...or does anyone have any other suggestions for either replacement batteries, or a modification of some sort?


Thanks,
nicole
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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:05 PM

Hi Nicole,
The battery voltage is so close as to not make any difference. To let the replacement batteries sit stable in the chamber, you can make up a small cardstock sleeve and/or using electrical tape wrapped around until it's built up enough of either. I've made up such battery supplies for my various cameras from all types; although some of the very small ones might not last as long. Even so, that's a moot point not to go ahead and make one up for yourself. With some cameras, a slight voltage change, of nearing a half volt will cause the light meter to underexpose slightly, and on others hardly any difference. The voltage variation here of using Two 1.4 volt cells will make 2.8 volts, that's only a tenth of a volt difference, and won't do anything. Stray light reflecting off a shiny surface is more of an exposure enemy than the voltage. I do suggest making sure the light meter is activated and working before running any film. This can be done by viewing thru the film gate while the camera is running, and observing the aperture closing down as you aim it towards a table lamp or light source and then moving it away again. While not fully indicative that the meter is accurate, it will let you know at least that it is responding to light and the battery is powering it. My only other recommendation here is to only shoot a few feet of film in that camera, and to finish the cartridge in another camera that you know works fine. This way you won't feel like you wasted an entire cartridge of film and processing just to find out if the camera works or not. You can always make some titles and/or shoot other stock footage that you can use as cutaways in projects later, with the rest of the film. Good luck and I hope your camera works fine.
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#3 Nicole Crescenzi

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:22 PM

thanks a million martin! I love the idea of making a small card stock sleeve...i'll try it out!

-Nicole
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#4 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 04:05 PM

http://www.smallbatt...y_catalogue.htm

http://www.wittner-k...erbr/a_batt.php
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