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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:25 PM

After a long shoot, I was chatting with a few camera ops, some from my area, some out of town from LA. We were discussing respective projects, and I mentioned a documentary I hope to make, and how for the reenactments, I wanted to change format based on the timeperiod: 16mm black and white for the 60s, color (16mm or Super 8) for the 70s, beta and vhs for the 80s, and so on.

They looked at me with bewilderment, and said, "Dude, just shoot it all in HD, and apply a filter in Final cut. It's way easier."

Easier. Do it in post. Apply a filter. Sigh.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:41 PM

It's easier for me to order a burrito from this mexican place in my neighborhood. But that doesn't make it better, nor necessarily cheaper. The understanding of this is what separates the wise from the smart.
Chin up, we all dance the HD devil once in awhile.
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#3 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 06:13 PM

I received a question about Katy Perry's music video "Teenage Dream" and how that "look" was achieved. It was shot on film was my answer. Even now, the more they see HD, the more people like film transferred to HD.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 09:05 PM

If the Hollywood suits ran the live concert world we'd all be watching concerts lit by the stadium sports event lighting because (quote) "They do the same job cheaper and we don't have to hire high priced LD's and programmers or spend fortunes for electrical and rigging crews".

Fortunately for concert goers, musicians are Artists (for the most part) and won't put up with that sort of economic argument crap...and they also know that the film look makes for a better music video in many cases.
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#5 Brian Rose

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:27 PM

I suppose what bothered me most was how readily they all subscribed to the easiest, cheapest method of achieving a result.

When it comes to formats, I have one first firmly planted in each realm: film and digital. I love them both, and believe neither is better nor worse than the other. They are all simply mediums with pros and cons that make them better applicable to some situations than others.

Not to mention I just don't believe you can replicate one thing to look like the other. Film will never look like digital, and digital will never match certain film stocks with qualities that are anathema to digital.

It was just such a shame that, in talking with fellow artisans, that they had lost (or perhaps never had) any imagination or inspiration. They just simply default for the easiest, the simplest, the cheapest, the method that can be reversed with the simple click of the "undo" button.

It has made me more resolved to pursue my original vision, because if my films are going to fail, I'd rather fail trying something different, then fail doing the same damn thing as these guys!
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:37 PM

Amen Brian. Good luck to you! Out of curiosity, have you considered 35mm for anything pre 1923 ;)
Are you thinking about trying to source an older tube camera for some of this, with it's requisite comet trails?
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#7 George Ebersole

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 02:49 AM

After a long shoot, I was chatting with a few camera ops, some from my area, some out of town from LA. We were discussing respective projects, and I mentioned a documentary I hope to make, and how for the reenactments, I wanted to change format based on the timeperiod: 16mm black and white for the 60s, color (16mm or Super 8) for the 70s, beta and vhs for the 80s, and so on.

They looked at me with bewilderment, and said, "Dude, just shoot it all in HD, and apply a filter in Final cut. It's way easier."

Easier. Do it in post. Apply a filter. Sigh.

Yeah, listen to your instincts, man. Fix it in post = $$$$. The time and aggravation you spend fixing the problem on the set always outweighs the "post-fix". I've never seen an exception to this rule. Not ever.

Listening to every director and producer I ever worked for when I was within earshot of an editing suite, it was always them cursing why they couldn't fix something on set/location. Then they'd spend hours or days trying to think of how to fix something. And that was just to come up with a solution, not to actually implement it.
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#8 Chris Durham

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 10:43 AM

It is sad. I have a really hard time finding any respect for people whose first inclination it is to do things the the easy way. If your concern is making art easier on yourself then your work will just be milktoast
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#9 John Sprung

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:15 PM

Are you thinking about trying to source an older tube camera for some of this, with it's requisite comet trails?


The go-to guy for that would be Chuck Pharis. He has a TK-41 among many other early professional TV cameras.

http://www.pharis-video.com/





-- J.S.
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#10 Brian Rose

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:09 PM

Amazing gear! Too bad my film post-dates the technology somewhat, being situated mainly in the mid 60s onward.

I love the look of 50s color television. The process was fairly similar to Technicolor in terms of the basic principles, and the results were quite beautiful and saturated.

Here's an exceptional early example:

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#11 K Borowski

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 04:59 PM

What are their qualifications?
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#12 Brian Rose

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 05:32 PM

What are their qualifications?


They've worked in LA. That makes them experts. ;)
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#13 herry

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 12:33 AM

They do the same job cheaper and we don't have to hire high priced LD's and programmers or spend fortunes for electrical and rigging crews.







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Edited by herry, 05 October 2010 - 12:37 AM.

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#14 Chris Durham

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 11:01 AM

They do the same job cheaper


Yup. Cheaper price. Cheaper quality.
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Technodolly

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